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Kathua rape case: HC rejects parole plea of key conspirator

The HC noted the possibility of a communal clash in J&K if the convict was let out on parole

09 Nov 2020

Image Courtesy:universalnewstimeline.com

In Sanji Ram v. State of Jammu and Kashmir and others (CRWP No. 8945 of 2020), the Punjab and Haryana High Court rejected the benefit of parole to Sanji Ram, who had previously been convicted in the Kathua rape and murder case. The court was hearing the plea of Sanji Ram, who prayed for parole for a period of 8 weeks in order to attend his son’s marriage.

Mr. Sonpreet Singh Brar, appeared as the Advocate for the petitioner. Senior Advocate R.S. Cheema with Arshdeep Singh Cheema and Mr. H.S. Grewal, Additional Advocate General, Punjab appeared for the respondents.

The Bench of Justice S. Muralidhar and Justice Avneesh Jhingan opined, “Given the genuine apprehension expressed as regards the possible law and order consequences if the petitioner’s prayer for parole is granted, the Court is not inclined to accept such prayer at this stage.”

The Bench took into account the report of the Senior Superintendent of Police, Crime Branch, Jammu dated October 31, 2020 which stated that the relatives of the victim had returned from the higher reaches to village Rasana, where the said marriage is scheduled to take place.

It was further argued that if the petitioner is granted parole to attend the marriage “there is every apprehension of there being community clashes and protests in the Union Territories of Jammu and Kashmir.”

Taking cognisance of the submissions, the court dismissed his petition.

Sanji Ram was the village head and priest of the temple where the crime allegedly took place. According to the charge sheet, on January 10, 2018 the 8-year-old girl was kidnapped and allegedly raped in captivity in a small village temple in Kathua district after having been kept sedated for four days before she died.

On June 10, 2019, the Pathankot special court, had awarded life sentence to Sanji Ram, Parvesh Kumar and Deepak Khajuria for the offence of murder under the Ranbir Penal Code. They have also been separately sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for the offence of gang rape under Section 376D of the Code and fined Rupees 1,00,000/- (rupees one lakh only).

The court noted that the main motive behind this tragic incident was the strained relations between the local Hindu community and nomadic Bakarwal Muslims.

The order may be read here:

Related:

Verdict in Kathua rape case gives hope, but India has certainly let her down
Kathua rape case; Judgement pronounced, Justice done
 

Kathua rape case: HC rejects parole plea of key conspirator

The HC noted the possibility of a communal clash in J&K if the convict was let out on parole

Image Courtesy:universalnewstimeline.com

In Sanji Ram v. State of Jammu and Kashmir and others (CRWP No. 8945 of 2020), the Punjab and Haryana High Court rejected the benefit of parole to Sanji Ram, who had previously been convicted in the Kathua rape and murder case. The court was hearing the plea of Sanji Ram, who prayed for parole for a period of 8 weeks in order to attend his son’s marriage.

Mr. Sonpreet Singh Brar, appeared as the Advocate for the petitioner. Senior Advocate R.S. Cheema with Arshdeep Singh Cheema and Mr. H.S. Grewal, Additional Advocate General, Punjab appeared for the respondents.

The Bench of Justice S. Muralidhar and Justice Avneesh Jhingan opined, “Given the genuine apprehension expressed as regards the possible law and order consequences if the petitioner’s prayer for parole is granted, the Court is not inclined to accept such prayer at this stage.”

The Bench took into account the report of the Senior Superintendent of Police, Crime Branch, Jammu dated October 31, 2020 which stated that the relatives of the victim had returned from the higher reaches to village Rasana, where the said marriage is scheduled to take place.

It was further argued that if the petitioner is granted parole to attend the marriage “there is every apprehension of there being community clashes and protests in the Union Territories of Jammu and Kashmir.”

Taking cognisance of the submissions, the court dismissed his petition.

Sanji Ram was the village head and priest of the temple where the crime allegedly took place. According to the charge sheet, on January 10, 2018 the 8-year-old girl was kidnapped and allegedly raped in captivity in a small village temple in Kathua district after having been kept sedated for four days before she died.

On June 10, 2019, the Pathankot special court, had awarded life sentence to Sanji Ram, Parvesh Kumar and Deepak Khajuria for the offence of murder under the Ranbir Penal Code. They have also been separately sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for the offence of gang rape under Section 376D of the Code and fined Rupees 1,00,000/- (rupees one lakh only).

The court noted that the main motive behind this tragic incident was the strained relations between the local Hindu community and nomadic Bakarwal Muslims.

The order may be read here:

Related:

Verdict in Kathua rape case gives hope, but India has certainly let her down
Kathua rape case; Judgement pronounced, Justice done
 

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Verdict in Kathua rape case gives hope, but India has certainly let her down

11 Jun 2019

On Monday, the special court in India convicted six people involved in the incident. Of them, three have been given life imprisonment, while three police officers have been sentenced for five years each for destroying the evidence.

 
Kathua
 
June 10 was a great day for those who have been fighting for justice to an eight-year-old victim of rape and murder.
 
This is especially true for the courageous Human Rights Lawyer, Deepika Singh Rajawat who stepped forward at personal risk to defend the family of Kathua rape victim, a Muslim nomad girl who was kidnapped, sexually assaulted, and killed by Hindu fundamentalists in the northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir in January 2018.
 
The horrific crime had attracted international attention. 
 
Those involved in the conspiracy wanted to terrorize and humiliate Muslims in the area by using rape as a weapon.
 
On Monday, the special court in India convicted six people involved in the incident. Of them, three have been given life imprisonment, while three police officers have been sentenced for five years each for destroying the evidence.
 
Rajawat faced threats and intimidation in the deeply polarized society of India. After all, the accused enjoyed the patronage of the ruling right-wing Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP), which holds power. Thanks to her advocacy, the case was transferred outside Jammu and Kashmir to ensure a fair trial.
 
While the verdict has certainly brought some relief, but if one looks at the broader picture the nomad girl has actually been let down by the Indian nation.
 
In the general election that concluded on May 19, the BJP came back to power with a brute majority. This time, the party that openly and shamelessly supported those involved in the gruesome act bagged 300 seats in the house of 543, more than 282 it captured in 2014.
 
If the Indian electorate was honest, the BJP should have been punished in these elections. Rather the party got rewarded by the Hindu majority. Apparently, the voters obsessed with the BJP’s outright sectarian agenda to transform the country into Hindu theocracy completely ignored the cries of the young girl.
 
Not only that, but the majority of voters also overlooked the fact that the girl was confined into a temple that was used for such a sacrilegious act. It seems that they weren’t even outraged over BJP folks coming out in support of the accused with the national flag.
 
The people who raped and murdered her, and those who came out on the streets to support them were merely few, but by re-electing a party that claims to be a custodian of Hindu religion and national interest the entire nation has deceived the soul of the little child.
 
Whatever may be the explanation, the May election results were in sharp contrast to the mandate of 2014 when the Prime Minister Narendra Modi ascended to power against the backdrop of the infamous Nirbhaya case.
 
In December 2012, a woman was gang raped and physically assaulted on a public bus in Delhi – the national capital of India. The victim later succumbed to her injuries. The death of Jyoti Singh Pandey - who came to be known as Nirbhaya was followed by angry protests in the capital.
 
The whole episode became a matter of shame for those in power. People thought that the government lacked will and strength to stop sexual violence on the streets of Delhi.
 
Among the demonstrators were the supporters of Modi and his party. Those opposed to the then-Congress government did not let the issue die until the next election.
 
Modi openly appealed to the voters not to forget what happened to Nirbhaya when they went to vote in the upcoming election. He categorically asked them to keep in mind the victim of Delhi rape before voting for the Lotus – the electoral symbol of BJP. Thus, the Delhi rape and murder became one of the many issues when Modi was elected to power in May 2014 with a hope for a strong government.
 
Come 2019, such drive was missing. Maybe The nomad girl wasn’t even on anyone’s mind.
 
It is pertinent to mention that the conspirators had also incited communal hatred against Muslim nomads accusing them of killing cows. The nomad girl had clearly become another victim of cow politics which has gripped the general mood of the nation ever since Modi first became the Prime Minister. Since Hindus consider a cow as a sacred animal, the self-styled cow vigilantes have intensified their hateful and violent campaign against Muslims and Christians all over the country. They continue to target these communities on suspicion of consuming beef.  
 
Modi, who never missed an opportunity to rake up the issue of Nirbhaya before his 2014 election remained silent on the sexual assault and murder of the nomad girl and did not find it necessary to reprimand his party men for supporting wrong people. 
 
Even otherwise, Modi was complicit in the 2002 anti-Muslim pogrom of Gujarat during which many young Muslim girls were raped by Hindu fundamentalists. The massacre followed the burning of a train carrying Hindu pilgrims. More than 50 people had died in the incident that was blamed on Islamic extremists by Modi, who was the Chief Minister of Gujarat back then. He wasn’t punished by the electorate that time either as he got a heavy majority in the assembly election that followed the massacre.
 
It’s a shame to see that the entire nation was on its feet when a Hindu woman was raped in Delhi and kept the issue alive until Modi got elected to power in 2014, but the same nation looked the other way when the nomad girl was raped and murdered in 2018 and forgot her completely when they re-elected those who defended her killers.
 
This is despite the fact that many social justice activists continued to remind people of what happened to the nomad girl before the election began.
 
The election results before the verdict are the result of pure hard work of people like Rajawat and the prosecutors. The incident and its following aftermath have proved that India is a majoritarian democracy where winning elections by scapegoating non- Hindus has become the norm.

Verdict in Kathua rape case gives hope, but India has certainly let her down

On Monday, the special court in India convicted six people involved in the incident. Of them, three have been given life imprisonment, while three police officers have been sentenced for five years each for destroying the evidence.

 
Kathua
 
June 10 was a great day for those who have been fighting for justice to an eight-year-old victim of rape and murder.
 
This is especially true for the courageous Human Rights Lawyer, Deepika Singh Rajawat who stepped forward at personal risk to defend the family of Kathua rape victim, a Muslim nomad girl who was kidnapped, sexually assaulted, and killed by Hindu fundamentalists in the northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir in January 2018.
 
The horrific crime had attracted international attention. 
 
Those involved in the conspiracy wanted to terrorize and humiliate Muslims in the area by using rape as a weapon.
 
On Monday, the special court in India convicted six people involved in the incident. Of them, three have been given life imprisonment, while three police officers have been sentenced for five years each for destroying the evidence.
 
Rajawat faced threats and intimidation in the deeply polarized society of India. After all, the accused enjoyed the patronage of the ruling right-wing Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP), which holds power. Thanks to her advocacy, the case was transferred outside Jammu and Kashmir to ensure a fair trial.
 
While the verdict has certainly brought some relief, but if one looks at the broader picture the nomad girl has actually been let down by the Indian nation.
 
In the general election that concluded on May 19, the BJP came back to power with a brute majority. This time, the party that openly and shamelessly supported those involved in the gruesome act bagged 300 seats in the house of 543, more than 282 it captured in 2014.
 
If the Indian electorate was honest, the BJP should have been punished in these elections. Rather the party got rewarded by the Hindu majority. Apparently, the voters obsessed with the BJP’s outright sectarian agenda to transform the country into Hindu theocracy completely ignored the cries of the young girl.
 
Not only that, but the majority of voters also overlooked the fact that the girl was confined into a temple that was used for such a sacrilegious act. It seems that they weren’t even outraged over BJP folks coming out in support of the accused with the national flag.
 
The people who raped and murdered her, and those who came out on the streets to support them were merely few, but by re-electing a party that claims to be a custodian of Hindu religion and national interest the entire nation has deceived the soul of the little child.
 
Whatever may be the explanation, the May election results were in sharp contrast to the mandate of 2014 when the Prime Minister Narendra Modi ascended to power against the backdrop of the infamous Nirbhaya case.
 
In December 2012, a woman was gang raped and physically assaulted on a public bus in Delhi – the national capital of India. The victim later succumbed to her injuries. The death of Jyoti Singh Pandey - who came to be known as Nirbhaya was followed by angry protests in the capital.
 
The whole episode became a matter of shame for those in power. People thought that the government lacked will and strength to stop sexual violence on the streets of Delhi.
 
Among the demonstrators were the supporters of Modi and his party. Those opposed to the then-Congress government did not let the issue die until the next election.
 
Modi openly appealed to the voters not to forget what happened to Nirbhaya when they went to vote in the upcoming election. He categorically asked them to keep in mind the victim of Delhi rape before voting for the Lotus – the electoral symbol of BJP. Thus, the Delhi rape and murder became one of the many issues when Modi was elected to power in May 2014 with a hope for a strong government.
 
Come 2019, such drive was missing. Maybe The nomad girl wasn’t even on anyone’s mind.
 
It is pertinent to mention that the conspirators had also incited communal hatred against Muslim nomads accusing them of killing cows. The nomad girl had clearly become another victim of cow politics which has gripped the general mood of the nation ever since Modi first became the Prime Minister. Since Hindus consider a cow as a sacred animal, the self-styled cow vigilantes have intensified their hateful and violent campaign against Muslims and Christians all over the country. They continue to target these communities on suspicion of consuming beef.  
 
Modi, who never missed an opportunity to rake up the issue of Nirbhaya before his 2014 election remained silent on the sexual assault and murder of the nomad girl and did not find it necessary to reprimand his party men for supporting wrong people. 
 
Even otherwise, Modi was complicit in the 2002 anti-Muslim pogrom of Gujarat during which many young Muslim girls were raped by Hindu fundamentalists. The massacre followed the burning of a train carrying Hindu pilgrims. More than 50 people had died in the incident that was blamed on Islamic extremists by Modi, who was the Chief Minister of Gujarat back then. He wasn’t punished by the electorate that time either as he got a heavy majority in the assembly election that followed the massacre.
 
It’s a shame to see that the entire nation was on its feet when a Hindu woman was raped in Delhi and kept the issue alive until Modi got elected to power in 2014, but the same nation looked the other way when the nomad girl was raped and murdered in 2018 and forgot her completely when they re-elected those who defended her killers.
 
This is despite the fact that many social justice activists continued to remind people of what happened to the nomad girl before the election began.
 
The election results before the verdict are the result of pure hard work of people like Rajawat and the prosecutors. The incident and its following aftermath have proved that India is a majoritarian democracy where winning elections by scapegoating non- Hindus has become the norm.

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Kathua rape case; Judgement pronounced, Justice done

10 Jun 2019
A special Pathankot Court on Monday, June 10, delivered its verdict in the Kathua rape case. The Court found six people guilty and sentenced three people to life imprisonment and three others to prison terms of over five years.

 
The verdict was delivered by District and Sessions Judge, Tejwinder Singh. The six people found guilty include Sanji Ram, the caretaker of the temple where the crime took place and his friend Parvesh Kumar. Four police personnel were also found guilty in the case. They are Special Police Officer Deepak Khajuria, Sub inspector Anand Dutta, Head Constable Tilak Raj and Special Officer Surender Verma. 
 
The main accused in the case Sanji Ram, his friend Parvesh Kumar and a special police officer Deepak Khajuria were sentenced to life imprisonment for offences under Sections 302 (murder) of the Ranbir Penal Code. They have also been separately sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for the offence of gang rape under Section 376D of the Code and fined Rupees 1,00,000/- (rupees one lakh only)

Three police men - Special Police Officer Surender Verma, Sub Inspector Anand Dutta and Head Constable Tilak Raj - who had allegedly taken Rs 4 lakh as bribe from Sanji Ram for sabotaging the case were sentenced to five years imprisonment for destruction of evidence and fined Rupees 25,000/- (rupees twenty five thousand only) 
 
The seventh accused, who may be a minor, was acquitted by the court.  As the court announced the quantum of punishment for the six convicts, the prosecution indicated that it might file petition over the acquittal of the priest's son and will challenge his age as he is said to be a juvenile. The girl's family had demanded the death penalty. The prosecution will also plead for death sentence for the convicts. 

Security arrangements were heightened around the court in view of announcement of the verdict. 
 
 
Brief background of the case's legal journey
 
The Supreme Court on May 7, 2018 had transfered the case from Kathua to Pathankot in Punjab amidst fears that the case might not get a fair trial within the state of Jammu and Kashmir due to the powerful political connections of the key accused. The day to day trial commenced in the first week of June last year at the district and sessions court in Pathankot in Punjab, about 100 km from Jammu and 30 km from Kathua, after the Supreme Court ordered that the case be shifted out of Jammu and Kashmir. 
 
The prosecution team, comprising of lawyers J K Chopra, S S Basra, Harminder Singh and Bhupinder Singh said they would examine the judgement and may go in for appeal against the sole acquittal. 

According to the charge sheet, the eight-year-old girl, who was kidnapped on January 10 last year, was allegedly raped in captivity in a small village temple in Kathua district. The child was reportedly raped while heavily sedated to prevent her from screaming or fighting back. Subsequently she was murdered and her body disposed off in the woods, where it was found on January 17. 
 
The girl belonged to a Muslim nomadic tribe and it was alleged that the crime was committed to scare the tribe away from the region. The case had become a bone of contention between PDP and BJP after two ministers of the saffron party, Chowdhary Lal Singh and Chander Prakash Ganga participated in a rally which was organised by Hindu Ekta Munch in support of the accused. 

Some lawyers of the Jammu Bar Association also held a violent strike preventing the police from submitting the charge sheet in the crime. Taking suo moto cognizance of the obstruction by lawyers and the special status enjoyed by accused in the State, the Supreme Court ordered the transfer  of trial of the case to Pathankot in the neighboring state of Punjab. Later, the apex court had ordered that the accused in the case should be shifted to Gurdaspur jail in Punjab from Kathua. 

Kathua rape case; Judgement pronounced, Justice done

A special Pathankot Court on Monday, June 10, delivered its verdict in the Kathua rape case. The Court found six people guilty and sentenced three people to life imprisonment and three others to prison terms of over five years.

 
The verdict was delivered by District and Sessions Judge, Tejwinder Singh. The six people found guilty include Sanji Ram, the caretaker of the temple where the crime took place and his friend Parvesh Kumar. Four police personnel were also found guilty in the case. They are Special Police Officer Deepak Khajuria, Sub inspector Anand Dutta, Head Constable Tilak Raj and Special Officer Surender Verma. 
 
The main accused in the case Sanji Ram, his friend Parvesh Kumar and a special police officer Deepak Khajuria were sentenced to life imprisonment for offences under Sections 302 (murder) of the Ranbir Penal Code. They have also been separately sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for the offence of gang rape under Section 376D of the Code and fined Rupees 1,00,000/- (rupees one lakh only)

Three police men - Special Police Officer Surender Verma, Sub Inspector Anand Dutta and Head Constable Tilak Raj - who had allegedly taken Rs 4 lakh as bribe from Sanji Ram for sabotaging the case were sentenced to five years imprisonment for destruction of evidence and fined Rupees 25,000/- (rupees twenty five thousand only) 
 
The seventh accused, who may be a minor, was acquitted by the court.  As the court announced the quantum of punishment for the six convicts, the prosecution indicated that it might file petition over the acquittal of the priest's son and will challenge his age as he is said to be a juvenile. The girl's family had demanded the death penalty. The prosecution will also plead for death sentence for the convicts. 

Security arrangements were heightened around the court in view of announcement of the verdict. 
 
 
Brief background of the case's legal journey
 
The Supreme Court on May 7, 2018 had transfered the case from Kathua to Pathankot in Punjab amidst fears that the case might not get a fair trial within the state of Jammu and Kashmir due to the powerful political connections of the key accused. The day to day trial commenced in the first week of June last year at the district and sessions court in Pathankot in Punjab, about 100 km from Jammu and 30 km from Kathua, after the Supreme Court ordered that the case be shifted out of Jammu and Kashmir. 
 
The prosecution team, comprising of lawyers J K Chopra, S S Basra, Harminder Singh and Bhupinder Singh said they would examine the judgement and may go in for appeal against the sole acquittal. 

According to the charge sheet, the eight-year-old girl, who was kidnapped on January 10 last year, was allegedly raped in captivity in a small village temple in Kathua district. The child was reportedly raped while heavily sedated to prevent her from screaming or fighting back. Subsequently she was murdered and her body disposed off in the woods, where it was found on January 17. 
 
The girl belonged to a Muslim nomadic tribe and it was alleged that the crime was committed to scare the tribe away from the region. The case had become a bone of contention between PDP and BJP after two ministers of the saffron party, Chowdhary Lal Singh and Chander Prakash Ganga participated in a rally which was organised by Hindu Ekta Munch in support of the accused. 

Some lawyers of the Jammu Bar Association also held a violent strike preventing the police from submitting the charge sheet in the crime. Taking suo moto cognizance of the obstruction by lawyers and the special status enjoyed by accused in the State, the Supreme Court ordered the transfer  of trial of the case to Pathankot in the neighboring state of Punjab. Later, the apex court had ordered that the accused in the case should be shifted to Gurdaspur jail in Punjab from Kathua. 

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One Year Later, Kathua Rape Victim's Family Still Lives in Fear

23 Jan 2019

One year has passed by, but the family of the eight-year-old Kathua rape and murder case victim still lives with the horror of the past, unable to get over the brutal end that their child met.


 

Courtesy: Newsclick.in

One Year Later, Kathua Rape Victim's Family Still Lives in Fear

One year has passed by, but the family of the eight-year-old Kathua rape and murder case victim still lives with the horror of the past, unable to get over the brutal end that their child met.


 

Courtesy: Newsclick.in

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Kathua victims legal counsel honoured in Canada

26 Jun 2018

Deepika Singh Rajawat is the legal counsel of Asifa Bano’s family. Asifa was an eight-year-old Muslim nomad girl who was abducted by Hindu extremists in January as part of a conspiracy to create fear in the minds of Muslims and force them to flee Kathua region.

 
Deepika Singh
 
Canada: Deepika Singh Rajawat – who is leading the fight for justice For Asifa’s family was honoured at a community event in Surrey, Canada on Sunday.
 
Rajawat is the legal counsel of Asifa Bano’s family. She was an eight-year-old Muslim nomad girl who was abducted by Hindu extremists in January as part of a conspiracy to create fear in the minds of Muslims and force them to flee Kathua region. Her body was later found in a forest. The forensic evidence and police investigation established that she was held captive for several days inside a temple, sedated and raped before being murdered. 
 
The arrests of the suspects, including a Special Police Officer, sparked angry protests from those owing allegiance to the ruling Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party. They wanted those arrested to be released. So much so, they hoisted the Indian national flag during the march taken out in support of the alleged perpetrators.

kathua lawyer
 
Rajawat has been facing threats on social media for standing up for Asifa – whose brutal rape and murder had caused worldwide outrage. There have been angry protests in Canada too. She also faced hostility from many male lawyers, including those defending the accused.
 
She was here to attend an annual community fair organized by Tiranjan – a progressive group of women which has been active in the South Asian community for many years. Amy Ghuman Sara who has been instrumental behind Tiranjan is known for raising awareness for gender equality. 
 
Rajawat told this writer that she has been subjected to character assassination and is distraught by an attempt to communalize the issue in the name of Hindu nationalism. She insisted that she is also a proud Hindu, but her brand of Hinduism teaches discipline and compassion, whereas those who are supporting the accused have been using abusive language against her on social media.
 
“All I am fighting against is the crime committed against a poor girl, not against any community.”
 
She asserted that she believes in the Indian constitution that is based on the principles of secularism and therefore cannot hold on to her religion when it comes to her duty. She added that nationalism does not demand that people who indulge in such heinous crimes should be supported. “What happened to a Muslim girl today can happen to a Hindu woman tomorrow.”
 
Rajawat hopes that the justice will prevail even though the prosecution is under a lot of pressure. Thanks to the efforts of the civil society, the trial of this highly sensitive case has been transferred outside Kashmir to ensure neutrality. The trial is in progress in the neighbouring state of Punjab.
 
Rajawat says that the fight is not over yet as the matter has been completely politicized under a highly polarized environment. She demanded that the Indians abroad must break their silence over ongoing atrocities under a right-wing government in India. “When people remain silent bad things grow.” 

Another lawyer, Talib Hussain, from the Gujjar Bakarwal community from which Asifa hailed, has also been battling the issue in the courts. CJP did an exclusive interview with both in April 2018.

Photo Credit: Supreem Singh

Related Articles
-- How two lawyers are bringing hope for the Bakarwal community seeking justice in the Kathua Rape Case 
-- SC transfers Kathua Rape and Murder case to Punjab, will monitor trial
 

Kathua victims legal counsel honoured in Canada

Deepika Singh Rajawat is the legal counsel of Asifa Bano’s family. Asifa was an eight-year-old Muslim nomad girl who was abducted by Hindu extremists in January as part of a conspiracy to create fear in the minds of Muslims and force them to flee Kathua region.

 
Deepika Singh
 
Canada: Deepika Singh Rajawat – who is leading the fight for justice For Asifa’s family was honoured at a community event in Surrey, Canada on Sunday.
 
Rajawat is the legal counsel of Asifa Bano’s family. She was an eight-year-old Muslim nomad girl who was abducted by Hindu extremists in January as part of a conspiracy to create fear in the minds of Muslims and force them to flee Kathua region. Her body was later found in a forest. The forensic evidence and police investigation established that she was held captive for several days inside a temple, sedated and raped before being murdered. 
 
The arrests of the suspects, including a Special Police Officer, sparked angry protests from those owing allegiance to the ruling Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party. They wanted those arrested to be released. So much so, they hoisted the Indian national flag during the march taken out in support of the alleged perpetrators.

kathua lawyer
 
Rajawat has been facing threats on social media for standing up for Asifa – whose brutal rape and murder had caused worldwide outrage. There have been angry protests in Canada too. She also faced hostility from many male lawyers, including those defending the accused.
 
She was here to attend an annual community fair organized by Tiranjan – a progressive group of women which has been active in the South Asian community for many years. Amy Ghuman Sara who has been instrumental behind Tiranjan is known for raising awareness for gender equality. 
 
Rajawat told this writer that she has been subjected to character assassination and is distraught by an attempt to communalize the issue in the name of Hindu nationalism. She insisted that she is also a proud Hindu, but her brand of Hinduism teaches discipline and compassion, whereas those who are supporting the accused have been using abusive language against her on social media.
 
“All I am fighting against is the crime committed against a poor girl, not against any community.”
 
She asserted that she believes in the Indian constitution that is based on the principles of secularism and therefore cannot hold on to her religion when it comes to her duty. She added that nationalism does not demand that people who indulge in such heinous crimes should be supported. “What happened to a Muslim girl today can happen to a Hindu woman tomorrow.”
 
Rajawat hopes that the justice will prevail even though the prosecution is under a lot of pressure. Thanks to the efforts of the civil society, the trial of this highly sensitive case has been transferred outside Kashmir to ensure neutrality. The trial is in progress in the neighbouring state of Punjab.
 
Rajawat says that the fight is not over yet as the matter has been completely politicized under a highly polarized environment. She demanded that the Indians abroad must break their silence over ongoing atrocities under a right-wing government in India. “When people remain silent bad things grow.” 

Another lawyer, Talib Hussain, from the Gujjar Bakarwal community from which Asifa hailed, has also been battling the issue in the courts. CJP did an exclusive interview with both in April 2018.

Photo Credit: Supreem Singh

Related Articles
-- How two lawyers are bringing hope for the Bakarwal community seeking justice in the Kathua Rape Case 
-- SC transfers Kathua Rape and Murder case to Punjab, will monitor trial
 

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SC transfers Kathua Rape and Murder case to Punjab, will monitor trial

07 May 2018
In a welcome development in the Kathua rape and murder case, the Supreme Court has transferred the case to a court in Pathankot, Punjab. This is significant given concerns that the accused in the case could use their political clout to derail justice.


Image Courtesy: Rediff

The Supreme Court has also ordered a day-to-day trial and clarified that this means there shall be no adjournments during the trial. The trial will be held in camera and the statements that have been recorded in Urdu will be translated into either Hindi or English for the Pathankot court. The trial will be held as per the provisions of the Ranbir Penal Code that is applicable to the state of J&K. The case will be presided over by the Pathankot District Judge and the SC will monitor the trial.

A bench of the Supreme Court headed by Chief Justice Dipak Misra was hearing a plea to transfer the case out of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K). The SC refused to examine a separate plea to hand over investigations in the case to the CBI. While the SC allowed the Jammu and Kashmir government to appoint a public prosecutor, it said that the state government should provide security to the victim’s family, their lawyer and witnesses in the case. This is also significant because Deepika Singh Rajawat, who is the victim’s lawyer, had alleged harassment from the Jammu Bar Association.

Supporters of the accused had earlier held a rally claiming they had been framed. The tricolour was also waved at this rally with much gusto as if to suggest the accused were national heroes who were being falsely implicated in the case. Later members of the Kathua Bar Association had tried to prevent the Crime Branch form filing a charge-sheet before the court in a clear case of obstruction of justice. The 15 page charge-sheet showcases the horrifying brutality of the case as well as how the accused had kidnapped, drugged, raped and murdered the little girl to scare and drive away the local nomadic Muslim Bakarwal community.
 

SC transfers Kathua Rape and Murder case to Punjab, will monitor trial

In a welcome development in the Kathua rape and murder case, the Supreme Court has transferred the case to a court in Pathankot, Punjab. This is significant given concerns that the accused in the case could use their political clout to derail justice.


Image Courtesy: Rediff

The Supreme Court has also ordered a day-to-day trial and clarified that this means there shall be no adjournments during the trial. The trial will be held in camera and the statements that have been recorded in Urdu will be translated into either Hindi or English for the Pathankot court. The trial will be held as per the provisions of the Ranbir Penal Code that is applicable to the state of J&K. The case will be presided over by the Pathankot District Judge and the SC will monitor the trial.

A bench of the Supreme Court headed by Chief Justice Dipak Misra was hearing a plea to transfer the case out of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K). The SC refused to examine a separate plea to hand over investigations in the case to the CBI. While the SC allowed the Jammu and Kashmir government to appoint a public prosecutor, it said that the state government should provide security to the victim’s family, their lawyer and witnesses in the case. This is also significant because Deepika Singh Rajawat, who is the victim’s lawyer, had alleged harassment from the Jammu Bar Association.

Supporters of the accused had earlier held a rally claiming they had been framed. The tricolour was also waved at this rally with much gusto as if to suggest the accused were national heroes who were being falsely implicated in the case. Later members of the Kathua Bar Association had tried to prevent the Crime Branch form filing a charge-sheet before the court in a clear case of obstruction of justice. The 15 page charge-sheet showcases the horrifying brutality of the case as well as how the accused had kidnapped, drugged, raped and murdered the little girl to scare and drive away the local nomadic Muslim Bakarwal community.
 

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'Fact finding' report by 'intellectuals' questions role of Kashmiri Crime Branch investigators in Kathua case

05 May 2018

In yet another attempt to discredit the investigation by the Crime Branch into the Kathua rape case, a ‘fact finding report’ by a group calling itself Group of Intellectuals and Academicians (GIA), claims that there are discrepancies in the charge-sheet and that the Crime Branch “botched-up” the investigations. However, a close inspection of these alleged discrepancies suggests that these are nothing more than an aggregation of fake news stories and various conspiracy theories being floated by right wing sympathisers and trolls. What’s worse, is that the report suggests that the Crime Branch may not have done a good job because of the presence of Kashmiris in the team!
 

Meet the 'Intellectuals'
The GIA comprises Meera Khadakkar (Retired District Judge, Nagpur), Monika Arora (Supreme Court Advocate), Sarjana Sharma (Journalist), Sonali Chitalkar (Professor) and Monica Aggarwal (Social activist). The group that submitted its report to Union Minister Jitendra Singh and demanded that the case be handed over to the CBI. The GIA claims they met more than 25 people including the victim's family, the accused family members, the influential people from the Bakarwal community and others. 

Argument-1: Presence of Kashmiris in Crime Branch Team  

"Three investigating teams rapidly changed one after another within a span of 10 days from January 12 to January 23. The crime branch team consists of two ethnic Kashmiris apart from the SSP Crime Branch Jammu who is also Kashmiri. In a sensitive case like this one and interstate like Jammu and Kashmir, this matters," notes the report. This clearly shows their communal bias given how while Jammu is Hindu majority region, Kashmir is predominantly Muslim.

The allusion to the incompetence and/or collusion of Muslim investigators in purposely tanking the case should ring enough alarm bells across civil society groups. This is also disturbing given how the charge-sheet clearly mentions that the little girl was raped and murdered because the accused wanted to scare and drive away the nomadic Muslim Bakarwal tribe from the region. The insidious communal colour becomes deeper when the report alleges that harassment by the Crime Branch is forcing Hindus to leave the Kathua region. With the scars of the Kashmiri Pandit exodus of the 90s still deep, such communally inflammatory allegations can cause further destabilisation in one of the most conflict ridden regions in the world.

Argument-2: Post Mortem does not mention Rape
The brutality of the crime had shaken people across the country forcing many to take to the streets. But the GIA report says that the post-mortem does not categorically state that the child was raped. "The charge sheet mentions gangrape by at least three persons over many days. This is not corroborated by the injuries described in the postmortem report. No such injuries are reported on the victim in the Kathua incident which according to the chargesheet is a gangrape. Postmortem report only mentions abrasions but no injuries," states the report. This is especially ridiculous given how the J&K Police had issued a press release shooting down fake news and categorically stating that the girl had indeed been raped. 

This reeks of the popular conspiracy theory that involves two post-mortems! The theory claimed that the little girl was never raped as the first post-mortem report does not mention it. The conspiracy theory further alleges that rape was added in the second post mortem report to sensationalise the case.

Argument-3: Rape not possible at the Dev Sthan
Meanwhile, Arora maintains that rape would be impossible in a prayer hall that had multiple doors and windows and the keys of which were in possession of four village elders. "There is neither any basement nor any floor. There is only a 20x35 feet room where there is no furniture except a three feet table. There are three windows and three doors. The windows have only grills and they are not covered. You can see from outside what is going on inside. There are four keys to the Dev Sthan which are with four elders of the village. People come and go there frequently," she said.

But this has also been debunked by The Quint in a piece that takes down multiple conspiracy theories. It says, “The Quint has visited the temple/prayer hall where the police states the girl was held captive and can certify that it is not a crowded temple. The temple is located in the middle of nowhere, with no houses adjacent to it for kilometres.” The Quint adds, “It is situated on a hilltop and is isolated from the Rasanna village which lies about a kilometre away from the hall. The walk, which leads to the village, is a lonely one. It opens up to a number of houses including the home of Sanji Ram. It is on this same path that the body of the victim was found on 17 January. The chargesheet states that that the Devisthan was exclusively manned by the main accused, Sanji Ram, to exclude any other person in the area.”

Last-ditch effort to derail Justice?
Is this yet another move to derail justice after the spectacularly juvenile attempt by lawyers to prevent the police from filing a chargesheet? Or is this a last ditch attempt by right wing sympathisers to protect the accused whose goose has virtually been cooked? Either way, these repeated endeavours to spread ridiculous and often outright incorrect information, are part of the wider conspiracy to sow the weeds of doubt in a case that has been brilliantly investigated by a team of skilled investigators... and a case that will be fought with equal elan and grace by a dedicated lawyer in the court. 

 

Related:

How Hate for Muslims sells and spreads on Social Media

Is a Police Press Release countering Fake News India’s ‘New Normal’?

Growing Communalism in Jammu

Report on Kathua Rape

'Fact finding' report by 'intellectuals' questions role of Kashmiri Crime Branch investigators in Kathua case

In yet another attempt to discredit the investigation by the Crime Branch into the Kathua rape case, a ‘fact finding report’ by a group calling itself Group of Intellectuals and Academicians (GIA), claims that there are discrepancies in the charge-sheet and that the Crime Branch “botched-up” the investigations. However, a close inspection of these alleged discrepancies suggests that these are nothing more than an aggregation of fake news stories and various conspiracy theories being floated by right wing sympathisers and trolls. What’s worse, is that the report suggests that the Crime Branch may not have done a good job because of the presence of Kashmiris in the team!
 

Meet the 'Intellectuals'
The GIA comprises Meera Khadakkar (Retired District Judge, Nagpur), Monika Arora (Supreme Court Advocate), Sarjana Sharma (Journalist), Sonali Chitalkar (Professor) and Monica Aggarwal (Social activist). The group that submitted its report to Union Minister Jitendra Singh and demanded that the case be handed over to the CBI. The GIA claims they met more than 25 people including the victim's family, the accused family members, the influential people from the Bakarwal community and others. 

Argument-1: Presence of Kashmiris in Crime Branch Team  

"Three investigating teams rapidly changed one after another within a span of 10 days from January 12 to January 23. The crime branch team consists of two ethnic Kashmiris apart from the SSP Crime Branch Jammu who is also Kashmiri. In a sensitive case like this one and interstate like Jammu and Kashmir, this matters," notes the report. This clearly shows their communal bias given how while Jammu is Hindu majority region, Kashmir is predominantly Muslim.

The allusion to the incompetence and/or collusion of Muslim investigators in purposely tanking the case should ring enough alarm bells across civil society groups. This is also disturbing given how the charge-sheet clearly mentions that the little girl was raped and murdered because the accused wanted to scare and drive away the nomadic Muslim Bakarwal tribe from the region. The insidious communal colour becomes deeper when the report alleges that harassment by the Crime Branch is forcing Hindus to leave the Kathua region. With the scars of the Kashmiri Pandit exodus of the 90s still deep, such communally inflammatory allegations can cause further destabilisation in one of the most conflict ridden regions in the world.

Argument-2: Post Mortem does not mention Rape
The brutality of the crime had shaken people across the country forcing many to take to the streets. But the GIA report says that the post-mortem does not categorically state that the child was raped. "The charge sheet mentions gangrape by at least three persons over many days. This is not corroborated by the injuries described in the postmortem report. No such injuries are reported on the victim in the Kathua incident which according to the chargesheet is a gangrape. Postmortem report only mentions abrasions but no injuries," states the report. This is especially ridiculous given how the J&K Police had issued a press release shooting down fake news and categorically stating that the girl had indeed been raped. 

This reeks of the popular conspiracy theory that involves two post-mortems! The theory claimed that the little girl was never raped as the first post-mortem report does not mention it. The conspiracy theory further alleges that rape was added in the second post mortem report to sensationalise the case.

Argument-3: Rape not possible at the Dev Sthan
Meanwhile, Arora maintains that rape would be impossible in a prayer hall that had multiple doors and windows and the keys of which were in possession of four village elders. "There is neither any basement nor any floor. There is only a 20x35 feet room where there is no furniture except a three feet table. There are three windows and three doors. The windows have only grills and they are not covered. You can see from outside what is going on inside. There are four keys to the Dev Sthan which are with four elders of the village. People come and go there frequently," she said.

But this has also been debunked by The Quint in a piece that takes down multiple conspiracy theories. It says, “The Quint has visited the temple/prayer hall where the police states the girl was held captive and can certify that it is not a crowded temple. The temple is located in the middle of nowhere, with no houses adjacent to it for kilometres.” The Quint adds, “It is situated on a hilltop and is isolated from the Rasanna village which lies about a kilometre away from the hall. The walk, which leads to the village, is a lonely one. It opens up to a number of houses including the home of Sanji Ram. It is on this same path that the body of the victim was found on 17 January. The chargesheet states that that the Devisthan was exclusively manned by the main accused, Sanji Ram, to exclude any other person in the area.”

Last-ditch effort to derail Justice?
Is this yet another move to derail justice after the spectacularly juvenile attempt by lawyers to prevent the police from filing a chargesheet? Or is this a last ditch attempt by right wing sympathisers to protect the accused whose goose has virtually been cooked? Either way, these repeated endeavours to spread ridiculous and often outright incorrect information, are part of the wider conspiracy to sow the weeds of doubt in a case that has been brilliantly investigated by a team of skilled investigators... and a case that will be fought with equal elan and grace by a dedicated lawyer in the court. 

 

Related:

How Hate for Muslims sells and spreads on Social Media

Is a Police Press Release countering Fake News India’s ‘New Normal’?

Growing Communalism in Jammu

Report on Kathua Rape

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Kathua Case: Fearful Bakarwals Oppose CBI Enquiry

02 May 2018

Newsclick caught up with the community as it moved up the mountains with its animals in an annual summer ritual.


Kathua Rape Case
 
The solitary and isolated house of Chaudhary Gulam Mohd Khatana is perched high on a mountain in Jammu region’s Doda district. A woman is feeding the buffaloes. A gust of breeze disturbs the dupatta that veils her face and she stops her work to set it right. Deep down in the valley, one can see the Chenab River and hear the muted roar of its rushing waters. With the arrival of summer, Khatana and other Bakarwals - the nomadic cattle and goat herding tribal community – have moved up from places like Kathua lower down to mountains in Doda, Badarwah and Khishtwar. Their animals prefer the cooler heights and fodder is plentiful in the meadows.

But below this idyllic peace is a simmering sense of fear and disquiet in the family, as in the whole Bakarwal community. The rape and murder of eight-year-old Bakarwal girl in Rasana village of Kathua district in January and the subsequent tumult has left the community scarred and terrified. The filing of chargesheet which revealed the horrendous torture that the tiny girl was put through, her abduction, repeated rape and ultimate murder, and the chilling conspiracy behind it shook the country. But for the Bakarwals, it was much more than that.

Khatana speaks both Gojri (a local dialect) and Kashmiri, but is comfortable with the latter. He has been worrying about the future of his community after the gruesome incident.

"We have never felt this vulnerable. As the news of rape spread, we couldn't sleep for many nights. We are more careful and vigilant now," said Khatana, adding that those who raped the little girl had no religion or caste.

According to Khatana, the incident has created fear among the Gujjar and Bakarwals who believe this was all a part of a conspiracy to evict them from the area.

Khatana is flanked by his brother Gulam Ahmed, who is impatient to say something himself.

"We believe this to be the part of conspiracy, as the plan to evict was already in place and it was revealed after Lal Singh became the Forest Minister. Singh has been brutal towards us. He has fenced the areas we live in and has explicitly asked us to leave the Jammu area. Eviction drives have substantially increased after he became the minister," said Gulam Ahmed.

Recently, BJP leader Lal Singh reportedly issued directions to District Forest Officers asking for the removal of encroachments from the forest land. He was also accused of threatening the tribal community by reminding them of the 1947 massacre.

"We clearly remember when Lal Singh asked us to remember 1947 and leave the area. Why are they bringing 1947 over and over again? Isn't it because in 1947 majority of Muslim population was killed and disloged from the state? Is the rape of the child another reminder of this?" Ahmed added.

CBI enquiry to suppress the case
After the submission of charge sheet by Crime Branch the local residents in Kathua and Jammu launched protests and demanded a CBI enquiry. The local outrage was supported by BJP leaders and the Bar Association of Jammu. Their demand was unanimous - they wanted a CBI enquiry, nothing less. Locals from the Hindu community of Rasana supported by assorted right-wing fringe groups have been protesting for the transfer of case to CBI.

The Bakarwals see these protests and the CBI enquiry demand in a different way.

"CBI enquiry is a conspiracy to suppress the case. It is an organized move. Have you noticed that none of the cases that CBI handled in Jammu and Kashmir have been successful? They were closed down citing no evidence. This is what they want to happen. They want to suppress this case," says Khatana.

As he talks, a curious little girl comes in to the room. Looking at her face, the wrinkles on Khatana’s forehead deepen.
"We knew they don't like us. But we never thought them to stoop this low," he says, pulling the girl into his lap and hugging her. The memory of what happened in Kathua to the girl who was murdered haunts his eyes.

Go to Kashmir
According to Gulam Ahmed, people from their community have been previously threatened to leave the Jammu area. They are often asked to go Kashmir and not come back. Gulam recalls an incident when their shanty was put on fire by the other community.

"We are not seen as Gujjar or Bakarwals. We are seen as Muslims. Whenever there is a stone pelting incident in Kashmir, we are threatened by the locals of Jammu. They once even put fire to our hut and we had to take a refuge in a Sikh's house for a month," Gulam said, adding that, the Hindu-Muslim divide has deepened and now they fear for their lives.

As evening descends on the mountains, the sound of Chenab grows deeper. Khatana counts the number of family members inside the house and closes the door for the night.

Courtesy: Newsclick.in

Kathua Case: Fearful Bakarwals Oppose CBI Enquiry

Newsclick caught up with the community as it moved up the mountains with its animals in an annual summer ritual.


Kathua Rape Case
 
The solitary and isolated house of Chaudhary Gulam Mohd Khatana is perched high on a mountain in Jammu region’s Doda district. A woman is feeding the buffaloes. A gust of breeze disturbs the dupatta that veils her face and she stops her work to set it right. Deep down in the valley, one can see the Chenab River and hear the muted roar of its rushing waters. With the arrival of summer, Khatana and other Bakarwals - the nomadic cattle and goat herding tribal community – have moved up from places like Kathua lower down to mountains in Doda, Badarwah and Khishtwar. Their animals prefer the cooler heights and fodder is plentiful in the meadows.

But below this idyllic peace is a simmering sense of fear and disquiet in the family, as in the whole Bakarwal community. The rape and murder of eight-year-old Bakarwal girl in Rasana village of Kathua district in January and the subsequent tumult has left the community scarred and terrified. The filing of chargesheet which revealed the horrendous torture that the tiny girl was put through, her abduction, repeated rape and ultimate murder, and the chilling conspiracy behind it shook the country. But for the Bakarwals, it was much more than that.

Khatana speaks both Gojri (a local dialect) and Kashmiri, but is comfortable with the latter. He has been worrying about the future of his community after the gruesome incident.

"We have never felt this vulnerable. As the news of rape spread, we couldn't sleep for many nights. We are more careful and vigilant now," said Khatana, adding that those who raped the little girl had no religion or caste.

According to Khatana, the incident has created fear among the Gujjar and Bakarwals who believe this was all a part of a conspiracy to evict them from the area.

Khatana is flanked by his brother Gulam Ahmed, who is impatient to say something himself.

"We believe this to be the part of conspiracy, as the plan to evict was already in place and it was revealed after Lal Singh became the Forest Minister. Singh has been brutal towards us. He has fenced the areas we live in and has explicitly asked us to leave the Jammu area. Eviction drives have substantially increased after he became the minister," said Gulam Ahmed.

Recently, BJP leader Lal Singh reportedly issued directions to District Forest Officers asking for the removal of encroachments from the forest land. He was also accused of threatening the tribal community by reminding them of the 1947 massacre.

"We clearly remember when Lal Singh asked us to remember 1947 and leave the area. Why are they bringing 1947 over and over again? Isn't it because in 1947 majority of Muslim population was killed and disloged from the state? Is the rape of the child another reminder of this?" Ahmed added.

CBI enquiry to suppress the case
After the submission of charge sheet by Crime Branch the local residents in Kathua and Jammu launched protests and demanded a CBI enquiry. The local outrage was supported by BJP leaders and the Bar Association of Jammu. Their demand was unanimous - they wanted a CBI enquiry, nothing less. Locals from the Hindu community of Rasana supported by assorted right-wing fringe groups have been protesting for the transfer of case to CBI.

The Bakarwals see these protests and the CBI enquiry demand in a different way.

"CBI enquiry is a conspiracy to suppress the case. It is an organized move. Have you noticed that none of the cases that CBI handled in Jammu and Kashmir have been successful? They were closed down citing no evidence. This is what they want to happen. They want to suppress this case," says Khatana.

As he talks, a curious little girl comes in to the room. Looking at her face, the wrinkles on Khatana’s forehead deepen.
"We knew they don't like us. But we never thought them to stoop this low," he says, pulling the girl into his lap and hugging her. The memory of what happened in Kathua to the girl who was murdered haunts his eyes.

Go to Kashmir
According to Gulam Ahmed, people from their community have been previously threatened to leave the Jammu area. They are often asked to go Kashmir and not come back. Gulam recalls an incident when their shanty was put on fire by the other community.

"We are not seen as Gujjar or Bakarwals. We are seen as Muslims. Whenever there is a stone pelting incident in Kashmir, we are threatened by the locals of Jammu. They once even put fire to our hut and we had to take a refuge in a Sikh's house for a month," Gulam said, adding that, the Hindu-Muslim divide has deepened and now they fear for their lives.

As evening descends on the mountains, the sound of Chenab grows deeper. Khatana counts the number of family members inside the house and closes the door for the night.

Courtesy: Newsclick.in

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Over 600 academics, scholars from India and abroad express "deep anger and anguish" over Kathua, Unnao in an open letter to PM

26 Apr 2018
To,
The Prime Minister of India,
Prime Minister’s Office, South Block,
Raisina Hill, New Delhi 110 001.
21 April 2018
Mr Prime Minister,

We are academics and independent scholars from India and abroad, writing to express solidarity with, and to endorse the sentiments expressed by, forty-nine retired civil servants in their open letter to you of April 16th 2018 (https://sabrangindia.in/article/honble-pm-modi-we-write-express-our-shame-anguish-and-rage).

Modi

Along with these civil servants and countless other citizens of India and the world at large, we wish to express our deep anger and anguish over the events in Kathua and Unnao and the aftermath of these events; over the efforts, in both cases, of those administering the relevant States to protect the alleged perpetrators of these monstrous crimes; over the subsequent profoundly distasteful efforts of rationalisation, deflection and diversion that have been so much in evidence in the reactions of your party’s spokespersons in the media; and finally over your own prolonged (and by now familiar) silence that was broken only recently with wholly inadequate, platitudinous, and  non-specific assurances of justice for the victims.

Kathua and Unnao are not isolated incidents. They are part of a pattern of repeated targeted attacks on minority religious communities, Dalits, tribals and women, in which rape and lynching have been employed as instruments of violence by gau rakshaks and others, in a sequence of events spread across Dadri in Uttar Pradesh (2015), Udhampur in Jammu and Kashmir (2015), Bijapur and Sukma in Chhattisgarh (2015-16), Harda in Madhya Pradesh (2016), Latehar in Jharkand (2016), Una in Gujarat (2016), Rohtak in Haryana (2017), Delhi (2017), Saharanpur in Uttar Pradesh (2017), and now Jammu and Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh (2018).

Many of these events have occurred in States with BJP Governments, and all of them after the BJP assumed power at the Centre. This is not to associate violence exclusively with your party and with State governments presided over by your party. But there is an undeniable association with the ruling dispensation.

There is little evidence, in government action, of an appreciation of the importance of providing assistance to vulnerable sections of the society – whether through promotional measures aimed at enabling tribals and nomads to have access to forest and common property rights, or through preventive measures aimed at discouraging blatant breaches of the rule of law. Even the Allahabad High Court on April 12th 2018 observed: “If this is the conduct of the police in the state, whom will a victim approach to register a complaint? If this is the stand you are repeatedly taking then we will be forced to observe in our order that law and order has collapsed in the state”.

We send you this letter because it is our duty to do so; so that we are not guilty of silence; and so that callousness and cowardice might finally draw the line at the broken body of a little girl and the rape of a young woman.
Signed:

List of signatories
  1. N Abhilaasha, Centre for Urban Equity, Ahmedabad
  2. Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University, New York, USA
  3. Arnab Acharya, Independent researcher, Washington D.C.
  4. Anindita Adhikari , Brown University, USA
  5. Tanvir Aeijaz, Ramjas College, Delhi
  6. Farzana Afridi, Delhi
  7. Aftab Ahmad, Columbia University, New York, USA
  8. Huma Ahmed-Ghosh, San Diego State University, CA, USA
  9. Aniket Alam, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad
  10. Seema Alavi, University of Delhi, Delhi
  11. Meena Alexander, Hunter College/Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, USA
  12. Dibyesh Anand, University of Westminster, UK
  13. Anandhi, Chennai.
  14. Krishna Ananth, SRM University – AP Amaravati
  15. Mary Anderson: Harvard University and Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, USA
  16. Aneesh, K.A., Jawaharlal Nehru Institute, New Delhi
  17. Gil Anidjar, Columbia University, New York, USA
  18. Anitha Kumary L, Trivandrum
  19. Sundari Anitha, University of Lincoln,  United Kingdom
  20. Annamalai, University of Chicago, USA
  21. Shaik Dawood Ansari, Open Campus Madang, University of Papua New Guinea
  22. Arjun Appadurai, New York University, New York, USA
  23. Anjali Arondekar, UCLA, USA
  24. Balveer Arora, Emeritus Professor and Chairman, Centre for Multilevel Federalism
  25. P K Yasser Arafath, University of Delhi, Delhi
  26. Shoba Arun, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
  27. Arunima, JNU, New Delhi
  28. Nina Asher, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, USA
  29. Kiran Asher, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
  30. Prashanth Asuri, Santa Clara University, USA
  31. Jayadev Athreya, University of Washington, USA
  32. Venkatesh Athreya, Social Activist and Retired Academic, Chennai
  33. Madhav Badami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  34. Amiya Kumar Bagchi, (Emeritus), Institute for Development Studies, Kolkata
  35. Barnita Bagchi, Utrecht University, Netherlands
  36. Neha Bagle, IIM Ahmedabad
  37. Vidura Jang Bahadur, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  38. Amit R. Baishya, Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Oklahoma
  39. Mira Bakhru, Retd faculty, IIM Bangalore, Bnagalore.
  40. Aparna Balachandran, University of Delhi, Delhi
  41. Radhika Balakrishnan, Rutgers University, U.S.A
  42. Sai Balakrishnan, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA
  43. Sujata Balasubramanian, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Hong Kong
  44. Swethaa S. Ballakrishnen, New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE
  45. Sibaji Bandyopadhyay, Retd Professor, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta
  46. Abhijit Banerjee, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  47. Arindam Banerjee, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  48. Chinmoy Banerjee, Emeritus, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
  49. Sukanya Banerjee, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
  50. Sumanta  Banerjee, Independent Researcher, Hyderabad
  51. Parama Barai, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.
  52. Syamal Kumar Basak (Retd), Presidency College/University, Kolkata
  53. Rakesh Basant, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  54. Alaka Basu, Cornell University, U.S.A
  55. Amrita Basu, Amherst College, Mass, USA
  56. Deepankar Basu, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  57. Kunal Basu, University of Oxford, UK
  58. Lopamudra Basu, University of Wisconsin-Stout
  59. Kanika Batra, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA
  60. Amita Baviskar, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi
  61. Rana P. Behal, University of Delhi, India.
  62. Jyothsna Belliappa, Bangalore
  63. Yael Berda, Hebrew University and Harvard University, USA
  64. Amit Bhaduri, (Emeritus), JNU, New Delhi.
  65. Monika Bhagat-Kennedy, University of Mississippi
  66. Manu Bhagavan, Hunter College and the Graduate Center-CUNY, New York, USA
  67. Alok Bhalla, Former Professor of English, English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.
  68. Sheila Bhalla, (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Visiting: Institute of Human Development, New Delhi
  69. Brenna Bhandar, SOAS, University of London, London UK
  70. Gauri Bharat, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  71. Ira Bhaskar, JNU, New Delhi
  72. Saurabh Bhattacharjee, The WB National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata
  73. Baidik Bhattacharya, University of Delhi. Delhi
  74. Neeladri Bhattacharya, Retd from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  75. Sucheta Bhattacharya, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  76. Debjani Bhattacharyya, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  77. Devaki Bhaya, Stanford, CA, USA
  78. Bhangya Bhukya, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  79. Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University, U.S.A.
  80. A K Biswas, Former Vice-Chancellor, B R Ambedkar Bihar University, Muzaffarpur, Bihar
  81. Bënil Biswas, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  82. Moinak Biswas, Professor, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  83. Cavery Bopaiah, Bangalore
  84. Mita Bose, retired, Indraprastha College, Delhi University and currently Adjunct faculty at ICFAI Business School, Gurugram, Haryana
  85. Tirthankar Bose, Simon Fraser University, Canada
  86. Saronik Bosu, New York University, New York, USA
  87. Guillaume Boucher, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
  88. Milind Brahme, Chennai, India
  89. Vacha Brat, IIM, Ahmedabad
  90. Carmen Bugan, writer and independent scholar, Long Island, USA
  91. Eleanor Byrne, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
  92. Maya Chadda, William Paterson University, NJ, USA
  93. Kunal Chakrabarti, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  94. Achin Chakraborty, Institute for Development Studies, Kolkata
  95. Chandrima Chakraborty, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
  96. Lekha Chakraborty, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi
  97. Madhurima Chakraborty, Columbia College Chicago
  98. Pinaki Chakraborty, New Delhi
  99. Rudrashish Chakraborty, Kirori Mal College, Delhi
  100. Shouvik Chakraborty, PERI, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  101. Ranabir Chakravarti, JNU, New Delhi
  102. Paula Chakravartty, New York University, New York, USA
  103. Mrinalini Chakravorty, University of Virginia, USA
  104. Barnali Chanda, Techno India University, Kolkata
  105. Sudhir Chandra, Historian
  106. Vinita Chandra, Ramjas College, Delhi
  107. P. Chandrasekhar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  108. Tarun Chandrayadula, IIT Madras, Chennai
  109. Charusheela,  University of Washington Bothell, USA
  110. Sayaka Chatani, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  111. Amita Chatterjee, Retired Professor of Philosophy, Jadavpur University
  112. Ananya Chatterjea, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  113. Indrani Chatterjee, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  114. Sreeparna Chattopadhyay, Bangalore
  115. Suchetana Chattopadhyay, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  116. Ruchi Chaturvedi, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  117. Amit Chaudhuri, Writer, Calcutta
  118. Aparna Chaudhuri, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
  119. Rosinka Chaudhuri, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta
  120. Sudip Chaudhuri, Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata.
  121. Sukanta Chaudhuri, (Emeritus), Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  122. Supriya Chaudhuri, (Emeritia). Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  123. Wendy Chavkin MD, MPH, Columbia University, New York, USA
  124. Ying Chen, New School for Social Research, New York, USA
  125. Anuradha Mitra Chenoy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  126. Kamal Mitra Chenoy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  127. Dolores Chew, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
  128. Anita Chikkatur, Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  129. Camille Cole, Yale University, U.S.A
  130. Andrew Cornford, Geneva Finance Observatory, Switzerland
  131. Amrita Chhachhi, International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands
  132. Jagdeep Chhokar, Professor (Retired), Indian Institute of Management,Ahmedabad
  133. Sarah E. Chinn, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, USA
  134. Deborah Choate, MD, Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Boston, USA
  135. Noam Chomsky, ( Emeritus) Massachussetts Institute of Technology, and University of Arizona, U.S.A
  136. Deepta Chopra, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  137. Elora Halim Chowdhury, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA
  138. Indira Chowdhury Bengaluru, India
  139. Indranil Chowdhury, University of Delhi, Delhi
  140. Nusrat S Chowdhury, Amherst College, Massachusetts, USA
  141. Sayandeb Chowdhury, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  142. Francis Cody, University of Toronto, Canada
  143. Karen Coelho, Madras Institute of Development Studies, Chennai
  144. Camille Cole, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
  145. Jonathan R. Cole, Columbia University, New York, USA
  146. Andrew Cornford, Geneva Finance Observatory, Switzerland
  147. Romar Correa, (Retd from) University of Mumbai, Mumbai
  148. Vedita Cowaloosur, Charles Telfair Institute, Mauritius
  149. Vasudha Dalmia, (Emerita), University of California, Berkeley
  150. Katyayani Dalmia, The New School for Social Research, New York, USA
  151. Sumangala Damodaran, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  152. Vinita Damodaran, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  153. Bijay K Danta, Tezpur, Assam
  154. Jane D’Arista, U/Mass, Amherst, USA
  155. Debapratim Das, Guwahati
  156. Debarshi Das, IIT Guwahati
  157. Mausumi Das, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi
  158. Raju J. Das, York University, Toronto, Canada
  159. Samantak Das, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  160. Shinjini Das, University of Oxford, UK
  161. Amlan Dasgupta, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  162. Anirban Dasgupta, South Asian University, New Delhi
  163. Indraneel Dasgupta, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
  164. Sunanda Dasgupta, Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg, Germany
  165. Sejuti Das Gupta, Michigan State University, USA
  166. Tanya Das Gupta, Toronto, Canada
  167. Minati Dash, ICSSR, New Delhi.
  168. Manipadma Datta, TERI School of Advanced Studies( Deemed University), New Delhi
  169. Ruth Davis, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA
  170. Subah Dayal, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA
  171. Rohit De, Yale University, New Haven, USA
  172. Ananya Debnath, Jodhpur, Rajastahn
  173. Sowmya Dechamma C C, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
  174. Narayana Delampady, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
  175. Minoo Derayeh, Toronto, Canada
  176. Manisha Desai, University of Connecticut, Storrs, USA
  177. Radhika Desai, University of Manitoba, Canada
  178. Jigna Desai, CEPT University, Ahmedabad.
  179. Jigna Desai, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  180. Miki and Madhavi Desai, Ahmedabad
  181. Renu Desai, Ahmedabad
  182. Anirudh Deshpande, Department of History, Delhi University
  183. Ashwini Deshpande, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi
  184. Satish Deshpande, Delhi University, Delhi
  185. Sudhanva Deshpande, LeftWord Books, New Delhi
  186. Peter Ronald deSouza, CSDS, Delhi
  187. Sanchia deSouza, University of Toronto, Canada
  188. Devika, J. Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram
  189. Ritu Dewan, Centre for Development Research and Action; Centre for Study of Society and Secularism, Mumbai
  190. Bikramjit Dey, The West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata
  191. Meena Dhanda, University of Wolverhampton, U. K
  192. Biswajit Dhar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  193. Anubha Dhasmana, Bangalore
  194. Roopa Dhawan, Ramjas​ College, Delhi University
  195. Jean Dreze, (Visiting): Ranchi University
  196. Rohan D’Souza, Kyoto University, Japan
  197. Prasenjit Duara, Duke University, Durham, USA
  198. Navroz K. Dubash, New Delhi
  199. Vebhuti Duggal, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  200. Durga Bhavani, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  201. Madhumita Dutta, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  202. Nandini Dutta, Miranda House, Delhi
  203. Souraj Dutta, St Andrews University, UK
  204. Nata Duvvury, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
  205. Carolyn Elliott, Professor Emerita, University of Vermont
  206. Meher Engineer, All India Forum on the Right to Education, New Delhi
  207. Gerald Epstein, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
  208. Pradeep Esteves, Context India, Bangalore
  209. Richard Falk, (Emeritus): Princeton University, U.S.A
  210. Alfredo Saad Filho, Department of Development Studies, SOAS University of London
  211. Michelle Fine, CUNY, New York, USA
  212. Nancy Folbre, PERI, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  213. Geraldine Forbes, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emerita, State University of New York Oswego, USA
  214. Colm Fox, Singapore Management University, School of Social Sciences, Singapore
  215. Smitha Francis, New Delhi
  216. Karen Gabriel, St Stephen’s College, Delhi
  217. Rahul K Gairola, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
  218. Toral Gajarawala, New York University, New York, USA
  219. Rajmohan Gandhi, Gurgaon
  220. Lata Gangadharan, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  221. Gangadhar, All India Forum for Right to Education
  222. Debjani Ganguly, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA
  223. Geetanjali Shree, Writer
  224. Maitreesh Ghatak, London Shool of Economics, U.K
  225. Saran Ghatak, Professor, Keene State College, USA
  226. Asher Ghertner, Rutgers University, USA
  227. Professor Aisha K. Gill, University of Roehampton, UK.
  228. Sayantan Ghosal, University of Glasgow, UK
  229. Arunabh Ghosh, Harvard University, U.S.A
  230. Devleena Ghosh, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
  231. Jayati Ghosh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  232. Partha Ghosh, Institute of Social Sciences, New Delhi
  233. Suman Ghosh, Florida Atlantic University , USA
  234. Geetha Gokul, St. Thomas’ College, Trichur, Kerala
  235. Priyamvada Gopal, University of Cambridge, UK
  236. Radha Gopalan, Independent Researcher and Educationist, Goa
  237. Gayatri Gopinath, New York University, New York, USA
  238. Manu Goswami, New York University, New York, USA
  239. Gregory Goulding, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA
  240. Paul Greenough, University of Iowa, USA
  241. Sumit Guha, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  242. Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for the Study of Social Sciences, Calcutta, Kolkata
  243. Akhil Gupta, University of California, Los Angeles
  244. Bishnupriya Gupta, Warwick University, UK
  245. Ruchira Gupta, New York University and University of California at Berkeley, U.S.A
  246. Sayan Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai.
  247. Smita Gupta, independent economist, New Delhi
  248. Vikas Gupta, Department of History, Delhi University, Delhi
  249. Vishal Gupta, Ahmedabad
  250. Dean Gupta-Casale, Kean University, NJ, USA
  251. Nira Gupta-Casale, Kean University, NJ, USA
  252. Jaideep Gupte, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex UK
  253. Shubhra Gururani, York University, Toronto, Canada
  254. Abha Dev Habib, Miranda House, Delhi
  255. John Harriss, Simon Fraser University and Centre for Modern Indian Studies, Goettingen, Germany
  256. Farhat Hasan, University of Delhi, Delhi.
  257. Zoya Hasan, (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  258. Rim Hassen, Warwick University, UK
  259. Neeraj Hatekar, University of Mumbai, Mumbai
  260. John C. Hawley, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA
  261. Himanshu, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  262. Indira Hirway, Center For Development Alternatives, Ahmedabad
  263. Nalini Iyer, Seattle University, USA
  264. Priyadarshini Iyer, IIM – Ahmedabad
  265. Srikanth Krishnan Iyer, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore
  266. Vijay Iyer, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
  267. Krati Jain, CEPT University, Ahmedabad, India
  268. Sanjay Jain, University of Oxford, UK
  269. Sarandha Jain, Columbia University, New York, USA
  270. Sheena Jain, formerly Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
  271. Kathleen James-Chakraborty, University College, Deublin, Ireland
  272. Sadia Jamil, Islamabad, Pakistan
  273. Russell Janis, J.D., University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  274. Niraja Gopal Jayal, JNU, New Delhi
  275. Jayaraj, retired economist, Chennai
  276. Rajshri Jayaraman, ESMT Berlin, Germany
  277. Katherine Jellison, Ohio University, USA
  278. Praveen Jha, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  279. Gita Johar, Columbia University, New York, USA
  280. May Joseph, Pratt Institute, New York, USA
  281. Yogi Joseph, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
  282. Chitra Joshi, Delhi University, New Delhi
  283. Rutul Joshi, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  284. Amalendu Jyotishi, Amrita School of Business, Bangalore
  285. Tanishka Kachru, National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad
  286. K K Kailash, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  287. A. Kalam, C. K. Prahalad Centre for Emerging India, Loyola campus, Chennai
  288. Vidya Kalaramadam, Willliam Paterson University of New Jersey, USA
  289. Sangeeta Kamat, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
  290. Uma S Kambhampati, University of Reading, Reading, UK
  291. Milind Kandlikar, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada,
  292. Kalpana Kannabiran, Council for Social Development, Hyderabad.
  293. Ankur Kapoor, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  294. Geeta Kapur, independent art critic, New Delhi
  295. Manju Kapur, writer and ex faculty Miranda House College, Delhi University, Delhi
  296. Ajit Karnik, Mumbai/Dubai
  297. Massoud Karshanas, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, U.K
  298. Malavika Kasturi, University of Toronto, Canada
  299. Nilofer Kaul, Delhi
  300. Nitasha Kaul, University of Westminster, UK
  301. Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University, New Jersey, USA
  302. Mukul Kesavan, Jamia Milia Islamia, New Delhi
  303. Prashant Keshavmurthy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  304. Rana Khan, Toronto, Canada
  305. Stuti Khanna, IIT Delhi, Delhi
  306. Sushil Khanna, (Retd.), Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata.
  307. Reetika Khera, IIT, Delhi
  308. Ateya Khorakiwala, Princeton University, NJ, USA
  309. Ayesha Kidwai, , Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  310. Viktoriya Kim, Osaka University, Japan
  311. Praveena Kodoth, Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum
  312. Dean Kotlowski, Salisbury University, MD, USA
  313. Ashok, Kotwal, (Emeritus): The University of British Columbia, Vancouver B.C, Canada
  314. Ashutosh V. Kotwal, Duke University, Durham, USA
  315. Astrid von Kotze, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
  316. Jane Krishnadas, School of Law, Keele., UK
  317. Preeti Krishnan, Bengaluru
  318. Radhika Krishnan, IIT Hyderabad
  319. Aishwary Kumar, School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University, USA
  320. Arun Kumar, Institute of Social Sciences, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi
  321. Avinash Kumar, Jawaharla Nehru University, New Delhi.
  322. Deepak Kumar, JNU, New Delhi
  323. Nita Kumar, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA, USA
  324. Udaya Kumar, Centre for English Studies, JNU, New Delhi.
  325. Rachel Kurien, International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  326. Somjita Laha, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  327. Nayanjot Lahiri, Ashoka University, Delhi
  328. Vinay Lal, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  329. Rachel Lee, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich, Germany
  330. Roselyn Lemus, Mexico City, USA
  331. Mark Liechty, The University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
  332. Cynthia A. Leenerts, East Stroudsburg University, PA, USA
  333. David Lelyveld, New York, USA
  334. Karen Leonard, University of California at Irvine, CA, USA
  335. Jinee Lokaneeta, Drew University, Madison, NJ, USA
  336. Ania Loomba, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  337. David Ludden, New York University, New York, USA
  338. Ritty Lukose, Associate Professor, New York University, USA.
  339. Anuja Madan, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA.
  340. Punnappurath Madhavan, English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad
  341. Aruna Magier, New York University, New York, USA
  342. Darshini Mahadevia, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  343. Swadesh M Mahajan, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  344. Ram Mahalingam, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  345. Durairaj Maheswaran, NYU, New York, USA
  346. Pushkar Maitra, Monash Business School, Monash University, Australia
  347. Bipasha Maity, Ashoka University, Sonepat, Haryana
  348. Rochona Majumdar, The University of Chicago, USA
  349. Anshu Malhotra, University of Delhi, Delhi
  350. Meenakshi Malhotra, Hansraj college, Delhi
  351. Ashok Malla, McGill University, Canada
  352. Mukul Mangalik, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
  353. Anandi Mani, University of Oxford, UK
  354. Preetha Mani, Rutgers University, USA
  355. Nissim Mannathukkaren, Dalhousie University Canada.
  356. Anuradha Marwah, Zakir Hussain College, New Delhi
  357. Raveena Mascarenhas, Mangaluru
  358. Manu V. Mathai, Bengaluru
  359. John Mathew, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
  360. Shency Mathew, Gulati Institute of Finance & Taxation, Thiruvananthapuram
  361. Navdeep Mathur, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  362. Deepak Maun, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad.
  363. Ranjani Mazumdar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  364. Lyla Mehta, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex UK
  365. Rushi Mehta, Utrecht, Netherlands
  366. Uday S. Mehta, Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, USA
  367. Gayatri Menon, Azim Premji University, Bengaluru
  368. Kalyani Devaki Menon, De Paul University, Chicago, USA
  369. Ritu Menon, Women Unlimited, New Delhi
  370. Kalyani Menon-Sen, Independent Researcher, New Delhi.
  371. Tushar Meshram, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
  372. Zain R. Mian, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  373. John Miller, Wheaton College, Massachussetts, U.S.A
  374. Raza Mir, William Paterson University, NJ, USA
  375. Payoshni Mitra, Independent researcher and activist, London, UK
  376. Siddhartha Mitra, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  377. Sona Mitra, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability, New Delhi
  378. Gautam Mody, New Trade Union Initiative
  379. Nasreen A. Mohamed, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  380. Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Syracuse University, NY, USA
  381. Mritiunjoy Mohanty, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Kolkata
  382. Himansu S. Mohapatra, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha
  383. Bidisha Mondal, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi
  384. Radhika Mongia, York University, Canada
  385. Dilip Mookherjee, Boston University, Boston MA, USA
  386. Sripad Motiram, University of Massachussetts, Boston, U.S.A
  387. Sharun Mukand, University of Warwick, UK
  388. Projit Bihari Mukharji, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  389. Ankhi Mukherjee, University of Oxford, UK
  390. Arun P. Mukherjee, Professor Emeritus, York University, Toronto, Canada.
  391. Ashesh Mukherjee, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  392. Debashree Mukherjee, Columbia University, New York, USA
  393. Debraj Mukherjee, Ramjas College, Delhi
  394. Sajni Mukherji, Retd. Professor, English dept., Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  395. Sanjukta Mukherjee, DePaul University, Chicago, USA
  396. Upamanyu Pablo Mukherjee, Warwick University, UK
  397. Harbans Mukhia, Former Professor of History and Rector, JNU, New Delhi
  398. Akshaya Mukul, Delhi
  399. Angelie Multani, Academic, New Delhi.
  400. Kanta Murali, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  401. Maroona Murmu, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  402. Hema A Murthy, Dept. of CS&E IIT Madras
  403. Ishwar Murthy, IIMB, Bangalore
  404. M V N Murthy, Professor Emeritus, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
  405. Rajluxmi Vaish Murthy, IIMB, Bangalore
  406. Milind Murugkar , researcher, Nashik , India
  407. Barnali Nag, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
  408. Richa Nagar, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, USA
  409. Nagaraj, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
  410. Harini Nagendra , Bangalore
  411. Ratna Naidu, Professor (retd.) University of Hyderabad and former Vice Chancellor,
SPMVV, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh
  1. Sirisha Naidu, Wright State University, Ohio
  2. Janaki Nair, JNU, New Delhi
  3. Constantine Nakassis, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  4. Ashis Nandy, CSDS, Delhi
  5. Gaura Narayan, Purchase College State University of New York, USA
  6. Sudha Narayanan, Economist, Mumbai
  7. Balmurli Natrajan, Willliam Paterson University of New Jersey, USA
  8. Nandan Nawn, TERI School of Advanced Studies, New Delhi
  9. Nalini Nayak, Associate Professor (Retired), PGDAV (M) College, Delhi University
  10. Nandini Nayak, Ambedkar University, Delhi.
  11. Anuradha Dingwaney Needha, Oberlin College, OH, USA
  12. Neeraja D, Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore
  13. Anjali Nerlekar, Rutgers University (New Jersey), USA
  14. Madhurima Nundy, Institute of Chinese Studies, Delhi
  15. Noreen O’Connor, King’s College, Pennsylvania
  16. Rupal Oza, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, USA
  17. Shivarama Padikkal, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  18. Debabrata Pal, New Delhi
  19. Parthapratim Pal, IIM Calcutta, Kolkata
  20. Amrita Pande,  University of Cape Town, South Africa
  21. Bratati Pande, Retired, Delhi University, Delhi
  22. Gyanendra Pandey, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA
  23. Rajyashree Pandey, Goldsmiths College, University of London, UK
  24. Kavita Panjabi, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  25. Ameet Parameswaran, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  26. Rajendra Parihar Ramjas College, Delhi
  27. Parthasarathy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai
  28. Sujata Patel, National Fellow, Indian Institute of Advanced Studies, Shimla
  29. Krishna Patel, Gandhinagar, Gujarat
  30. Shekhar Pathak, Historian and Editor, Pithorgarh, Uttarakhand
  31. Vikram Pathania, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  32. Prabhat Patnaik, (Emeritus): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  33. Ramesh Patnaik, Andhra Pradesh Save Education Committee,
  34. Utsa Patnaik  (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  35. ​Sonali Perera, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York
  36. Rosalind Petchesky, (Emerita):, Hunter College & the Graduate Center, CUNY
  37. Geralyn Pinto, Mangalore
  38. Justin Podur, York University, Toronto, Canada
  39. Robert Pollin, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A.
  40. Sheldon Pollock, Columbia University, New York, USA
  41. Anupama Potluri, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  42. Gopalji Pradhan, School of Letters, Ambedkar, University Delhi
  43. R.Prakash. ARTIC, Srikakulam district, Andhra Pradesh.
  44. Lokesh Malti Prakash, Activist & Writer, Office Secretary, All India Forum for Right to Education
  45. Anup Pramanik, Indian Institute of Management, Indore
  46. Madhu Prasad. New Delhi
  47. Vijay Prashad, LeftWord Books.
  48. Navtej Purewal, SOAS University of London
  49. Jyoti Puri, Simmons College, Boston, USA
  50. Bandana Purkayastha, Grafton, MA, USA
  51. Meena Radhakrishna, former faculty, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi University
  52. Raghavendra, N. Faculty, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad
  53. Harriet Raghunathan, Jesus and Mary College (retired), New Delhi
  54. Rohit Rahi, London School of Economics, UK
  55. Shirin M. Rai, Warwick University, UK
  56. Rajeswari Sarla Raina, Scientist, New Delhi
  57. Anisa Rahim, Jersey City, NJ
  58. Arvind Rajagopal, New York University, New York, USA
  59. Mrinalini Rajagopalan, University of Pittsburgh, USA
  60. Advaita Rajendra, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  61. Prabina Rajib, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.
  62. Surampudi Bapi Raju, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
  63. Priti Ramamurthy, University of Washington, Seattle
  64. Bhavani Raman, University of Toronto, Canada
  65. Usha Raman, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  66. Vasanthi Raman, Independent social scientist, New Delhi
  67. Bharat Ramaswami, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
  68. Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University, Durham USA
  69. Kavitha Ranganathan, IIM-Ahmedabad
  70. Malini Ranganathan, Assistant Professor, American University, Washington, DC
  71. Surabhi Ranganathan, University of Cambridge, UK
  72. Ajay Rao, University of Toronto, Canada
  73. Anupama Rao, Barnard College, New York, USA
  74. Govinda Rao, (Emeritus): National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, Bangalore
  75. Mohan Rao, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  76. Mohan Rao, JNU, New Delhi
  77. Nitya Rao, University of east Anglia, Norwich, UK
  78. Sumathi Rao, Harish-chandra Research Institute, Allahabad
  79. Rashmi Kumari, IIM Ahmedabad
  80. Manav Ratti, Salisbury University, MD, USA
  81. Chitra Ravi, visiting faculty at the Azim Premji University, Bangalore, India.
  82. Anushnath Ravichandran, Coimbatore
  83. Vikas Rawal, Jawaharlal Nehru Uiversity, New Delhi
  84. Debraj Ray, New York University, New York, USA
  85. Raka Ray, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
  86. Ranjan Ray, Economist, Melbourne, Australia
  87. Aparna Rayaprol, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  88. Chandan Reddy, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  89. Gayatri Reddy, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
  90. Rammanohar Reddy, (Visiting): Goa University, Hyderabad
  91. Rohit Revi, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada
  92. Shaunna Rodrigues, Columbia University, New York, USA
  93. Dunu Roy, Director, Hazards Centre, New Delhi
  94. Mallarika Sinha Roy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  95. Modhumita Roy, Tufts University, USA
  96. Parama Roy, University of California, Davis
  97. Satyaki Roy, Institute for Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi
  98. Srila Roy, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  99. Srirupa Roy, University of Göttingen, Germany
  100. Anamitra Roychowdhury, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  101. Marlene Rutzendorfer, Harvard University Visiting Scholar, Cambridge, MA, USA
  102. Sachin N, Dyal Singh college, New Delhi
  103. Niladri Saha, Basirhat College, West Bengal
  104. Poulomi Saha, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  105. Bhairabi Prasad Sahu, University of Delhi., Delhi
  106. Arupjyoti Saikia, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati.
  107. Rajgopal Saikumar, New York University, New York, USA
  108. Kalyani Samantray, Visiting Professor, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar
  109. Padmanabh Samarendra, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
  110. Preeti Sampat, Ambedkar University Delhi.
  111. Samson, Nizamabad district, Telengana
  112. Sudipto Sanyal, Techno India University, Kolkata
  113. Aditya Sarkar, University of Warwick, UK
  114. Sumit Sarkar, (Retired): Delhi University, New Delhi
  115. Tanika Sarkar, (Retired): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  116. Akshya Saxena, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
  117. Susan Seizer, Indiana University,  Bloomington IN, USA
  118. Abhijit Sen, Retd from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  119. Hari Sen, Ramjas College, Delhi
  120. Nivedita Sen, Hansraj College, Delhi
  121. Rukmini Sen, Ambedkar University, New Delhi
  122. Sambuddha Sen, Shiv Nadar University, Delhi
  123. Sanghita Sen, St Andrews University, UK
  124. Abhijit Sengupta, University of Essex, UK
  125. Debjani Sengupta, IP College, Delhi University, Delhi
  126. Aaditeshwar Seth, IIT Delhi, Delhi
  127. Puneet Seth, Beachwood, Ohio
  128. Sanjay Seth, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
  129. Svati P. Shah, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
  130. Rachna Shanbog, Dublin, UK
  131. Krupa Shandilya, Amherst College, USA
  132. Arul Shankar, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  133. Shiva Shankar, Scientist, Chennai.
  134. Alpana Sharma, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, USA
  135. Jayeeta Sharma, University of Toronto, Canada
  136. Shailja Sharma, De Paul University, Chicago, USA
  137. Shilpa Sharma, University of Delhi, Delhi
  138. Abhishek Shaw, Economic & Political Weekly, Mumbai
  139. Samira Sheikh, Vanderbilt University, USA
  140. Sherin B.S, The English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad
  141. Parinitha Shetty, Mangaluru, Karnataka
  142. Tim Shiell, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA
  143. Snehal Shingavi, Associate Professor, English, University of Texas, Austin
  144. Anooradha Iyer Siddiqui, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA
  145. Amritjit Singh, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA
  146. Harjinder Singh, IIIT- Hyderabad.
  147. Natasha Singh, Oakland, CA
  148. Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes Business School, Oxford
  149. Radhika Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  150. Supriya Singh, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
  151. Upinder Singh, University of Delhi, New Delhi
  152. Vidhu Singh, San Francisco, CA, USA
  153. Dipa Sinha, Ambedkar University Delhi
  154. Rita Sinha, Janki Devi Memorial College, Delhi
  155. Shana Sippy, Centre College, KY, and Carleton College, MN, USA
  156. Ajay Skaria, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  157. Sobha Rani, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  158. Srilata, K., Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai
  159. Jeena T Srinivasan, Centre for Economic and Social Studies, Hyderabad
  160. Krithika Srinivasan, University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  161. Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
  162. Ravindran Sriramachandran, Ashoka University, Sonipat, Haryana
  163. Neelam Srivastava, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
  164. Priyanka Srivastava, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  165. Hamsa Stainton, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  166. Domna C. Stanton, Graduate Center, City University of New York, USA
  167. Abigail J. Stewart, University of Michigan
  168. Catherine Stimpson, New York University, New York, USA
  169. Sivagami Subbaraman, Washington D.C., USA
  170. Binaya Subedi, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
  171. K Venkata Subrahmanyam, Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai.
  172. Banu Subramaniam, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  173. Lakshmi Subramanian, Institute of Advanced Studies, Nantes, France
  174. Narendra Subramanian, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  175. Subramanian, Independent Scholar and former ICSSR National Fellow, Chennai.
  176. Mita Sujan, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA
  177. Nandini Sundar, Delhi University, New Delhi
  178. Vivan Sundaram, artist, New Delhi
  179. S. Sunder, retired professor, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
  180. Kaushik Sunder Rajan, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  181. Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, New York University, U.S.A.
  182. Shamina Talyarkhan, New York, USA
  183. Ashwini Tambe, University of Maryland, MD, USA
  184. Tanima, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  185. Akshaya Tankha, University of Toronto, Canada
  186. Anand Teltumbde, GIM, Goa
  187. Tariq Thachil, Vanderbilt University, USA
  188. Manish Thakur , IIM Calcutta, Kolkata
  189. Binitha Thampi.. IIT Madras, Chennai
  190. Susie Tharu, Hyderabad
  191. Dania Thomas – University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  192. Thomas Joseph Thoomkuzhy, Gulati Institute of Finance & Taxation, Thiruvananthapuram
  193. Miriam Ticktin, The New School for Social Research, NYC, USA
  194. Ahmet Tonak, (Visiting): University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.
  195. Nasir Tyabji, formerly with Jamia Milia Islamia, New Delhi
  196. Sahana Udupa, Professor of Media Anthropology, University of Munich (LMU), Germany
  197. Lalit Vachani, CeMIS, University of Göttingen
  198. Ananya Vajpeyi, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi.
  199. Vamsi Vakulabharanam, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
  200. Achin Vanaik, Retd from Delhi University, New Delhi
  201. Sarah Van Arsdale, NYU and Antioch University/LA
  202. Hendrik Van Den Berg, (Emeritus): University of Nebraska, U.S.A
  203. Poornima Varma, IIM, Ahmedabad.
  204. Rahul Varma, playwright and artistic director of Teesri Duniya Theatre
  205. Rashmi Varma, Warwick University, UK
  206. Rohit Varman, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Kolkata
  207. Ravi Vasudevan, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi
  208. Sylvia Jane Vatuk, Professor Emerita of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  209. Malathi Velamuri, Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India
  210. Shikha Verma, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  211. K. Vijayan, Hindu College, Delhi
  212. Bhaskar Vira, University of Cambridge, UK
  213. Sujata Visaria, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong.
  214. Gauri Viswanathan, Columbia University, New York, USA
  215. Kamala Visweswaran, University of California San Diego, CA, USA
  216. Shweta Wagh, KRVIA Mumbai
  217. Gareth Wall , University of Birmingham, UK
  218. Jini Watson, New York University, New York, USA
  219. Amanda Weidman, Bryn Mawr College, USA
  220. Thomas Weisskopf, (Emeritus): University of Michigan, U.S.A
  221. Jeannette Wicks-Lim, PERI, University of Massachusetts, Amherst , USA
  222. David Winter, (Emeritus): University of Michigan, USA
  223. Pramod Yadava, Retd Professor, JNU, New Delhi
  224. Louise Yelin, Professor Emerita, Purchase College, Purchase NY, USA
  225. Nobuharu Yokokawa, Musashi University, Japan
  226. Shundana Yusaf, University of Utah, USA

Over 600 academics, scholars from India and abroad express "deep anger and anguish" over Kathua, Unnao in an open letter to PM

To,
The Prime Minister of India,
Prime Minister’s Office, South Block,
Raisina Hill, New Delhi 110 001.
21 April 2018
Mr Prime Minister,

We are academics and independent scholars from India and abroad, writing to express solidarity with, and to endorse the sentiments expressed by, forty-nine retired civil servants in their open letter to you of April 16th 2018 (https://sabrangindia.in/article/honble-pm-modi-we-write-express-our-shame-anguish-and-rage).

Modi

Along with these civil servants and countless other citizens of India and the world at large, we wish to express our deep anger and anguish over the events in Kathua and Unnao and the aftermath of these events; over the efforts, in both cases, of those administering the relevant States to protect the alleged perpetrators of these monstrous crimes; over the subsequent profoundly distasteful efforts of rationalisation, deflection and diversion that have been so much in evidence in the reactions of your party’s spokespersons in the media; and finally over your own prolonged (and by now familiar) silence that was broken only recently with wholly inadequate, platitudinous, and  non-specific assurances of justice for the victims.

Kathua and Unnao are not isolated incidents. They are part of a pattern of repeated targeted attacks on minority religious communities, Dalits, tribals and women, in which rape and lynching have been employed as instruments of violence by gau rakshaks and others, in a sequence of events spread across Dadri in Uttar Pradesh (2015), Udhampur in Jammu and Kashmir (2015), Bijapur and Sukma in Chhattisgarh (2015-16), Harda in Madhya Pradesh (2016), Latehar in Jharkand (2016), Una in Gujarat (2016), Rohtak in Haryana (2017), Delhi (2017), Saharanpur in Uttar Pradesh (2017), and now Jammu and Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh (2018).

Many of these events have occurred in States with BJP Governments, and all of them after the BJP assumed power at the Centre. This is not to associate violence exclusively with your party and with State governments presided over by your party. But there is an undeniable association with the ruling dispensation.

There is little evidence, in government action, of an appreciation of the importance of providing assistance to vulnerable sections of the society – whether through promotional measures aimed at enabling tribals and nomads to have access to forest and common property rights, or through preventive measures aimed at discouraging blatant breaches of the rule of law. Even the Allahabad High Court on April 12th 2018 observed: “If this is the conduct of the police in the state, whom will a victim approach to register a complaint? If this is the stand you are repeatedly taking then we will be forced to observe in our order that law and order has collapsed in the state”.

We send you this letter because it is our duty to do so; so that we are not guilty of silence; and so that callousness and cowardice might finally draw the line at the broken body of a little girl and the rape of a young woman.
Signed:

List of signatories
  1. N Abhilaasha, Centre for Urban Equity, Ahmedabad
  2. Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University, New York, USA
  3. Arnab Acharya, Independent researcher, Washington D.C.
  4. Anindita Adhikari , Brown University, USA
  5. Tanvir Aeijaz, Ramjas College, Delhi
  6. Farzana Afridi, Delhi
  7. Aftab Ahmad, Columbia University, New York, USA
  8. Huma Ahmed-Ghosh, San Diego State University, CA, USA
  9. Aniket Alam, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad
  10. Seema Alavi, University of Delhi, Delhi
  11. Meena Alexander, Hunter College/Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, USA
  12. Dibyesh Anand, University of Westminster, UK
  13. Anandhi, Chennai.
  14. Krishna Ananth, SRM University – AP Amaravati
  15. Mary Anderson: Harvard University and Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, USA
  16. Aneesh, K.A., Jawaharlal Nehru Institute, New Delhi
  17. Gil Anidjar, Columbia University, New York, USA
  18. Anitha Kumary L, Trivandrum
  19. Sundari Anitha, University of Lincoln,  United Kingdom
  20. Annamalai, University of Chicago, USA
  21. Shaik Dawood Ansari, Open Campus Madang, University of Papua New Guinea
  22. Arjun Appadurai, New York University, New York, USA
  23. Anjali Arondekar, UCLA, USA
  24. Balveer Arora, Emeritus Professor and Chairman, Centre for Multilevel Federalism
  25. P K Yasser Arafath, University of Delhi, Delhi
  26. Shoba Arun, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
  27. Arunima, JNU, New Delhi
  28. Nina Asher, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, USA
  29. Kiran Asher, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
  30. Prashanth Asuri, Santa Clara University, USA
  31. Jayadev Athreya, University of Washington, USA
  32. Venkatesh Athreya, Social Activist and Retired Academic, Chennai
  33. Madhav Badami, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  34. Amiya Kumar Bagchi, (Emeritus), Institute for Development Studies, Kolkata
  35. Barnita Bagchi, Utrecht University, Netherlands
  36. Neha Bagle, IIM Ahmedabad
  37. Vidura Jang Bahadur, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  38. Amit R. Baishya, Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Oklahoma
  39. Mira Bakhru, Retd faculty, IIM Bangalore, Bnagalore.
  40. Aparna Balachandran, University of Delhi, Delhi
  41. Radhika Balakrishnan, Rutgers University, U.S.A
  42. Sai Balakrishnan, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA
  43. Sujata Balasubramanian, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Hong Kong
  44. Swethaa S. Ballakrishnen, New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE
  45. Sibaji Bandyopadhyay, Retd Professor, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta
  46. Abhijit Banerjee, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  47. Arindam Banerjee, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  48. Chinmoy Banerjee, Emeritus, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
  49. Sukanya Banerjee, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
  50. Sumanta  Banerjee, Independent Researcher, Hyderabad
  51. Parama Barai, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.
  52. Syamal Kumar Basak (Retd), Presidency College/University, Kolkata
  53. Rakesh Basant, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  54. Alaka Basu, Cornell University, U.S.A
  55. Amrita Basu, Amherst College, Mass, USA
  56. Deepankar Basu, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  57. Kunal Basu, University of Oxford, UK
  58. Lopamudra Basu, University of Wisconsin-Stout
  59. Kanika Batra, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA
  60. Amita Baviskar, Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi
  61. Rana P. Behal, University of Delhi, India.
  62. Jyothsna Belliappa, Bangalore
  63. Yael Berda, Hebrew University and Harvard University, USA
  64. Amit Bhaduri, (Emeritus), JNU, New Delhi.
  65. Monika Bhagat-Kennedy, University of Mississippi
  66. Manu Bhagavan, Hunter College and the Graduate Center-CUNY, New York, USA
  67. Alok Bhalla, Former Professor of English, English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.
  68. Sheila Bhalla, (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, and Visiting: Institute of Human Development, New Delhi
  69. Brenna Bhandar, SOAS, University of London, London UK
  70. Gauri Bharat, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  71. Ira Bhaskar, JNU, New Delhi
  72. Saurabh Bhattacharjee, The WB National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata
  73. Baidik Bhattacharya, University of Delhi. Delhi
  74. Neeladri Bhattacharya, Retd from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  75. Sucheta Bhattacharya, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  76. Debjani Bhattacharyya, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  77. Devaki Bhaya, Stanford, CA, USA
  78. Bhangya Bhukya, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  79. Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University, U.S.A.
  80. A K Biswas, Former Vice-Chancellor, B R Ambedkar Bihar University, Muzaffarpur, Bihar
  81. Bënil Biswas, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  82. Moinak Biswas, Professor, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  83. Cavery Bopaiah, Bangalore
  84. Mita Bose, retired, Indraprastha College, Delhi University and currently Adjunct faculty at ICFAI Business School, Gurugram, Haryana
  85. Tirthankar Bose, Simon Fraser University, Canada
  86. Saronik Bosu, New York University, New York, USA
  87. Guillaume Boucher, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
  88. Milind Brahme, Chennai, India
  89. Vacha Brat, IIM, Ahmedabad
  90. Carmen Bugan, writer and independent scholar, Long Island, USA
  91. Eleanor Byrne, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
  92. Maya Chadda, William Paterson University, NJ, USA
  93. Kunal Chakrabarti, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  94. Achin Chakraborty, Institute for Development Studies, Kolkata
  95. Chandrima Chakraborty, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
  96. Lekha Chakraborty, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi
  97. Madhurima Chakraborty, Columbia College Chicago
  98. Pinaki Chakraborty, New Delhi
  99. Rudrashish Chakraborty, Kirori Mal College, Delhi
  100. Shouvik Chakraborty, PERI, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  101. Ranabir Chakravarti, JNU, New Delhi
  102. Paula Chakravartty, New York University, New York, USA
  103. Mrinalini Chakravorty, University of Virginia, USA
  104. Barnali Chanda, Techno India University, Kolkata
  105. Sudhir Chandra, Historian
  106. Vinita Chandra, Ramjas College, Delhi
  107. P. Chandrasekhar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  108. Tarun Chandrayadula, IIT Madras, Chennai
  109. Charusheela,  University of Washington Bothell, USA
  110. Sayaka Chatani, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  111. Amita Chatterjee, Retired Professor of Philosophy, Jadavpur University
  112. Ananya Chatterjea, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  113. Indrani Chatterjee, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  114. Sreeparna Chattopadhyay, Bangalore
  115. Suchetana Chattopadhyay, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  116. Ruchi Chaturvedi, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  117. Amit Chaudhuri, Writer, Calcutta
  118. Aparna Chaudhuri, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
  119. Rosinka Chaudhuri, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta
  120. Sudip Chaudhuri, Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata.
  121. Sukanta Chaudhuri, (Emeritus), Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  122. Supriya Chaudhuri, (Emeritia). Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  123. Wendy Chavkin MD, MPH, Columbia University, New York, USA
  124. Ying Chen, New School for Social Research, New York, USA
  125. Anuradha Mitra Chenoy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  126. Kamal Mitra Chenoy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  127. Dolores Chew, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
  128. Anita Chikkatur, Carleton College, Northfield, MN
  129. Camille Cole, Yale University, U.S.A
  130. Andrew Cornford, Geneva Finance Observatory, Switzerland
  131. Amrita Chhachhi, International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, The Netherlands
  132. Jagdeep Chhokar, Professor (Retired), Indian Institute of Management,Ahmedabad
  133. Sarah E. Chinn, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, USA
  134. Deborah Choate, MD, Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Boston, USA
  135. Noam Chomsky, ( Emeritus) Massachussetts Institute of Technology, and University of Arizona, U.S.A
  136. Deepta Chopra, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  137. Elora Halim Chowdhury, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA
  138. Indira Chowdhury Bengaluru, India
  139. Indranil Chowdhury, University of Delhi, Delhi
  140. Nusrat S Chowdhury, Amherst College, Massachusetts, USA
  141. Sayandeb Chowdhury, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  142. Francis Cody, University of Toronto, Canada
  143. Karen Coelho, Madras Institute of Development Studies, Chennai
  144. Camille Cole, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
  145. Jonathan R. Cole, Columbia University, New York, USA
  146. Andrew Cornford, Geneva Finance Observatory, Switzerland
  147. Romar Correa, (Retd from) University of Mumbai, Mumbai
  148. Vedita Cowaloosur, Charles Telfair Institute, Mauritius
  149. Vasudha Dalmia, (Emerita), University of California, Berkeley
  150. Katyayani Dalmia, The New School for Social Research, New York, USA
  151. Sumangala Damodaran, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  152. Vinita Damodaran, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  153. Bijay K Danta, Tezpur, Assam
  154. Jane D’Arista, U/Mass, Amherst, USA
  155. Debapratim Das, Guwahati
  156. Debarshi Das, IIT Guwahati
  157. Mausumi Das, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi
  158. Raju J. Das, York University, Toronto, Canada
  159. Samantak Das, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  160. Shinjini Das, University of Oxford, UK
  161. Amlan Dasgupta, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  162. Anirban Dasgupta, South Asian University, New Delhi
  163. Indraneel Dasgupta, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
  164. Sunanda Dasgupta, Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg, Germany
  165. Sejuti Das Gupta, Michigan State University, USA
  166. Tanya Das Gupta, Toronto, Canada
  167. Minati Dash, ICSSR, New Delhi.
  168. Manipadma Datta, TERI School of Advanced Studies( Deemed University), New Delhi
  169. Ruth Davis, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA
  170. Subah Dayal, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA
  171. Rohit De, Yale University, New Haven, USA
  172. Ananya Debnath, Jodhpur, Rajastahn
  173. Sowmya Dechamma C C, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
  174. Narayana Delampady, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala
  175. Minoo Derayeh, Toronto, Canada
  176. Manisha Desai, University of Connecticut, Storrs, USA
  177. Radhika Desai, University of Manitoba, Canada
  178. Jigna Desai, CEPT University, Ahmedabad.
  179. Jigna Desai, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  180. Miki and Madhavi Desai, Ahmedabad
  181. Renu Desai, Ahmedabad
  182. Anirudh Deshpande, Department of History, Delhi University
  183. Ashwini Deshpande, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi
  184. Satish Deshpande, Delhi University, Delhi
  185. Sudhanva Deshpande, LeftWord Books, New Delhi
  186. Peter Ronald deSouza, CSDS, Delhi
  187. Sanchia deSouza, University of Toronto, Canada
  188. Devika, J. Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram
  189. Ritu Dewan, Centre for Development Research and Action; Centre for Study of Society and Secularism, Mumbai
  190. Bikramjit Dey, The West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata
  191. Meena Dhanda, University of Wolverhampton, U. K
  192. Biswajit Dhar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  193. Anubha Dhasmana, Bangalore
  194. Roopa Dhawan, Ramjas​ College, Delhi University
  195. Jean Dreze, (Visiting): Ranchi University
  196. Rohan D’Souza, Kyoto University, Japan
  197. Prasenjit Duara, Duke University, Durham, USA
  198. Navroz K. Dubash, New Delhi
  199. Vebhuti Duggal, Ambedkar University, Delhi
  200. Durga Bhavani, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  201. Madhumita Dutta, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
  202. Nandini Dutta, Miranda House, Delhi
  203. Souraj Dutta, St Andrews University, UK
  204. Nata Duvvury, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
  205. Carolyn Elliott, Professor Emerita, University of Vermont
  206. Meher Engineer, All India Forum on the Right to Education, New Delhi
  207. Gerald Epstein, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
  208. Pradeep Esteves, Context India, Bangalore
  209. Richard Falk, (Emeritus): Princeton University, U.S.A
  210. Alfredo Saad Filho, Department of Development Studies, SOAS University of London
  211. Michelle Fine, CUNY, New York, USA
  212. Nancy Folbre, PERI, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  213. Geraldine Forbes, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emerita, State University of New York Oswego, USA
  214. Colm Fox, Singapore Management University, School of Social Sciences, Singapore
  215. Smitha Francis, New Delhi
  216. Karen Gabriel, St Stephen’s College, Delhi
  217. Rahul K Gairola, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
  218. Toral Gajarawala, New York University, New York, USA
  219. Rajmohan Gandhi, Gurgaon
  220. Lata Gangadharan, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  221. Gangadhar, All India Forum for Right to Education
  222. Debjani Ganguly, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA
  223. Geetanjali Shree, Writer
  224. Maitreesh Ghatak, London Shool of Economics, U.K
  225. Saran Ghatak, Professor, Keene State College, USA
  226. Asher Ghertner, Rutgers University, USA
  227. Professor Aisha K. Gill, University of Roehampton, UK.
  228. Sayantan Ghosal, University of Glasgow, UK
  229. Arunabh Ghosh, Harvard University, U.S.A
  230. Devleena Ghosh, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
  231. Jayati Ghosh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  232. Partha Ghosh, Institute of Social Sciences, New Delhi
  233. Suman Ghosh, Florida Atlantic University , USA
  234. Geetha Gokul, St. Thomas’ College, Trichur, Kerala
  235. Priyamvada Gopal, University of Cambridge, UK
  236. Radha Gopalan, Independent Researcher and Educationist, Goa
  237. Gayatri Gopinath, New York University, New York, USA
  238. Manu Goswami, New York University, New York, USA
  239. Gregory Goulding, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA
  240. Paul Greenough, University of Iowa, USA
  241. Sumit Guha, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  242. Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for the Study of Social Sciences, Calcutta, Kolkata
  243. Akhil Gupta, University of California, Los Angeles
  244. Bishnupriya Gupta, Warwick University, UK
  245. Ruchira Gupta, New York University and University of California at Berkeley, U.S.A
  246. Sayan Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai.
  247. Smita Gupta, independent economist, New Delhi
  248. Vikas Gupta, Department of History, Delhi University, Delhi
  249. Vishal Gupta, Ahmedabad
  250. Dean Gupta-Casale, Kean University, NJ, USA
  251. Nira Gupta-Casale, Kean University, NJ, USA
  252. Jaideep Gupte, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex UK
  253. Shubhra Gururani, York University, Toronto, Canada
  254. Abha Dev Habib, Miranda House, Delhi
  255. John Harriss, Simon Fraser University and Centre for Modern Indian Studies, Goettingen, Germany
  256. Farhat Hasan, University of Delhi, Delhi.
  257. Zoya Hasan, (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  258. Rim Hassen, Warwick University, UK
  259. Neeraj Hatekar, University of Mumbai, Mumbai
  260. John C. Hawley, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, USA
  261. Himanshu, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  262. Indira Hirway, Center For Development Alternatives, Ahmedabad
  263. Nalini Iyer, Seattle University, USA
  264. Priyadarshini Iyer, IIM – Ahmedabad
  265. Srikanth Krishnan Iyer, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore
  266. Vijay Iyer, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
  267. Krati Jain, CEPT University, Ahmedabad, India
  268. Sanjay Jain, University of Oxford, UK
  269. Sarandha Jain, Columbia University, New York, USA
  270. Sheena Jain, formerly Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
  271. Kathleen James-Chakraborty, University College, Deublin, Ireland
  272. Sadia Jamil, Islamabad, Pakistan
  273. Russell Janis, J.D., University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A
  274. Niraja Gopal Jayal, JNU, New Delhi
  275. Jayaraj, retired economist, Chennai
  276. Rajshri Jayaraman, ESMT Berlin, Germany
  277. Katherine Jellison, Ohio University, USA
  278. Praveen Jha, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  279. Gita Johar, Columbia University, New York, USA
  280. May Joseph, Pratt Institute, New York, USA
  281. Yogi Joseph, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
  282. Chitra Joshi, Delhi University, New Delhi
  283. Rutul Joshi, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  284. Amalendu Jyotishi, Amrita School of Business, Bangalore
  285. Tanishka Kachru, National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad
  286. K K Kailash, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  287. A. Kalam, C. K. Prahalad Centre for Emerging India, Loyola campus, Chennai
  288. Vidya Kalaramadam, Willliam Paterson University of New Jersey, USA
  289. Sangeeta Kamat, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
  290. Uma S Kambhampati, University of Reading, Reading, UK
  291. Milind Kandlikar, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada,
  292. Kalpana Kannabiran, Council for Social Development, Hyderabad.
  293. Ankur Kapoor, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  294. Geeta Kapur, independent art critic, New Delhi
  295. Manju Kapur, writer and ex faculty Miranda House College, Delhi University, Delhi
  296. Ajit Karnik, Mumbai/Dubai
  297. Massoud Karshanas, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, U.K
  298. Malavika Kasturi, University of Toronto, Canada
  299. Nilofer Kaul, Delhi
  300. Nitasha Kaul, University of Westminster, UK
  301. Rajender Kaur, William Paterson University, New Jersey, USA
  302. Mukul Kesavan, Jamia Milia Islamia, New Delhi
  303. Prashant Keshavmurthy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  304. Rana Khan, Toronto, Canada
  305. Stuti Khanna, IIT Delhi, Delhi
  306. Sushil Khanna, (Retd.), Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata.
  307. Reetika Khera, IIT, Delhi
  308. Ateya Khorakiwala, Princeton University, NJ, USA
  309. Ayesha Kidwai, , Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  310. Viktoriya Kim, Osaka University, Japan
  311. Praveena Kodoth, Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum
  312. Dean Kotlowski, Salisbury University, MD, USA
  313. Ashok, Kotwal, (Emeritus): The University of British Columbia, Vancouver B.C, Canada
  314. Ashutosh V. Kotwal, Duke University, Durham, USA
  315. Astrid von Kotze, University of the Western Cape, South Africa
  316. Jane Krishnadas, School of Law, Keele., UK
  317. Preeti Krishnan, Bengaluru
  318. Radhika Krishnan, IIT Hyderabad
  319. Aishwary Kumar, School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University, USA
  320. Arun Kumar, Institute of Social Sciences, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi
  321. Avinash Kumar, Jawaharla Nehru University, New Delhi.
  322. Deepak Kumar, JNU, New Delhi
  323. Nita Kumar, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA, USA
  324. Udaya Kumar, Centre for English Studies, JNU, New Delhi.
  325. Rachel Kurien, International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  326. Somjita Laha, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  327. Nayanjot Lahiri, Ashoka University, Delhi
  328. Vinay Lal, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  329. Rachel Lee, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich, Germany
  330. Roselyn Lemus, Mexico City, USA
  331. Mark Liechty, The University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
  332. Cynthia A. Leenerts, East Stroudsburg University, PA, USA
  333. David Lelyveld, New York, USA
  334. Karen Leonard, University of California at Irvine, CA, USA
  335. Jinee Lokaneeta, Drew University, Madison, NJ, USA
  336. Ania Loomba, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  337. David Ludden, New York University, New York, USA
  338. Ritty Lukose, Associate Professor, New York University, USA.
  339. Anuja Madan, Kansas State University, Kansas, USA.
  340. Punnappurath Madhavan, English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad
  341. Aruna Magier, New York University, New York, USA
  342. Darshini Mahadevia, CEPT University, Ahmedabad
  343. Swadesh M Mahajan, University of Texas at Austin, USA
  344. Ram Mahalingam, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  345. Durairaj Maheswaran, NYU, New York, USA
  346. Pushkar Maitra, Monash Business School, Monash University, Australia
  347. Bipasha Maity, Ashoka University, Sonepat, Haryana
  348. Rochona Majumdar, The University of Chicago, USA
  349. Anshu Malhotra, University of Delhi, Delhi
  350. Meenakshi Malhotra, Hansraj college, Delhi
  351. Ashok Malla, McGill University, Canada
  352. Mukul Mangalik, Ramjas College, University of Delhi
  353. Anandi Mani, University of Oxford, UK
  354. Preetha Mani, Rutgers University, USA
  355. Nissim Mannathukkaren, Dalhousie University Canada.
  356. Anuradha Marwah, Zakir Hussain College, New Delhi
  357. Raveena Mascarenhas, Mangaluru
  358. Manu V. Mathai, Bengaluru
  359. John Mathew, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
  360. Shency Mathew, Gulati Institute of Finance & Taxation, Thiruvananthapuram
  361. Navdeep Mathur, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  362. Deepak Maun, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad.
  363. Ranjani Mazumdar, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.
  364. Lyla Mehta, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex UK
  365. Rushi Mehta, Utrecht, Netherlands
  366. Uday S. Mehta, Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, USA
  367. Gayatri Menon, Azim Premji University, Bengaluru
  368. Kalyani Devaki Menon, De Paul University, Chicago, USA
  369. Ritu Menon, Women Unlimited, New Delhi
  370. Kalyani Menon-Sen, Independent Researcher, New Delhi.
  371. Tushar Meshram, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
  372. Zain R. Mian, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  373. John Miller, Wheaton College, Massachussetts, U.S.A
  374. Raza Mir, William Paterson University, NJ, USA
  375. Payoshni Mitra, Independent researcher and activist, London, UK
  376. Siddhartha Mitra, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  377. Sona Mitra, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability, New Delhi
  378. Gautam Mody, New Trade Union Initiative
  379. Nasreen A. Mohamed, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  380. Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Syracuse University, NY, USA
  381. Mritiunjoy Mohanty, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Kolkata
  382. Himansu S. Mohapatra, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha
  383. Bidisha Mondal, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, New Delhi
  384. Radhika Mongia, York University, Canada
  385. Dilip Mookherjee, Boston University, Boston MA, USA
  386. Sripad Motiram, University of Massachussetts, Boston, U.S.A
  387. Sharun Mukand, University of Warwick, UK
  388. Projit Bihari Mukharji, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  389. Ankhi Mukherjee, University of Oxford, UK
  390. Arun P. Mukherjee, Professor Emeritus, York University, Toronto, Canada.
  391. Ashesh Mukherjee, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  392. Debashree Mukherjee, Columbia University, New York, USA
  393. Debraj Mukherjee, Ramjas College, Delhi
  394. Sajni Mukherji, Retd. Professor, English dept., Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  395. Sanjukta Mukherjee, DePaul University, Chicago, USA
  396. Upamanyu Pablo Mukherjee, Warwick University, UK
  397. Harbans Mukhia, Former Professor of History and Rector, JNU, New Delhi
  398. Akshaya Mukul, Delhi
  399. Angelie Multani, Academic, New Delhi.
  400. Kanta Murali, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  401. Maroona Murmu, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  402. Hema A Murthy, Dept. of CS&E IIT Madras
  403. Ishwar Murthy, IIMB, Bangalore
  404. M V N Murthy, Professor Emeritus, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
  405. Rajluxmi Vaish Murthy, IIMB, Bangalore
  406. Milind Murugkar , researcher, Nashik , India
  407. Barnali Nag, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
  408. Richa Nagar, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, USA
  409. Nagaraj, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai
  410. Harini Nagendra , Bangalore
  411. Ratna Naidu, Professor (retd.) University of Hyderabad and former Vice Chancellor,
SPMVV, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh
  1. Sirisha Naidu, Wright State University, Ohio
  2. Janaki Nair, JNU, New Delhi
  3. Constantine Nakassis, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  4. Ashis Nandy, CSDS, Delhi
  5. Gaura Narayan, Purchase College State University of New York, USA
  6. Sudha Narayanan, Economist, Mumbai
  7. Balmurli Natrajan, Willliam Paterson University of New Jersey, USA
  8. Nandan Nawn, TERI School of Advanced Studies, New Delhi
  9. Nalini Nayak, Associate Professor (Retired), PGDAV (M) College, Delhi University
  10. Nandini Nayak, Ambedkar University, Delhi.
  11. Anuradha Dingwaney Needha, Oberlin College, OH, USA
  12. Neeraja D, Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Bangalore
  13. Anjali Nerlekar, Rutgers University (New Jersey), USA
  14. Madhurima Nundy, Institute of Chinese Studies, Delhi
  15. Noreen O’Connor, King’s College, Pennsylvania
  16. Rupal Oza, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, USA
  17. Shivarama Padikkal, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  18. Debabrata Pal, New Delhi
  19. Parthapratim Pal, IIM Calcutta, Kolkata
  20. Amrita Pande,  University of Cape Town, South Africa
  21. Bratati Pande, Retired, Delhi University, Delhi
  22. Gyanendra Pandey, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA
  23. Rajyashree Pandey, Goldsmiths College, University of London, UK
  24. Kavita Panjabi, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  25. Ameet Parameswaran, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  26. Rajendra Parihar Ramjas College, Delhi
  27. Parthasarathy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai
  28. Sujata Patel, National Fellow, Indian Institute of Advanced Studies, Shimla
  29. Krishna Patel, Gandhinagar, Gujarat
  30. Shekhar Pathak, Historian and Editor, Pithorgarh, Uttarakhand
  31. Vikram Pathania, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  32. Prabhat Patnaik, (Emeritus): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  33. Ramesh Patnaik, Andhra Pradesh Save Education Committee,
  34. Utsa Patnaik  (Emerita): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  35. ​Sonali Perera, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York
  36. Rosalind Petchesky, (Emerita):, Hunter College & the Graduate Center, CUNY
  37. Geralyn Pinto, Mangalore
  38. Justin Podur, York University, Toronto, Canada
  39. Robert Pollin, University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.A.
  40. Sheldon Pollock, Columbia University, New York, USA
  41. Anupama Potluri, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  42. Gopalji Pradhan, School of Letters, Ambedkar, University Delhi
  43. R.Prakash. ARTIC, Srikakulam district, Andhra Pradesh.
  44. Lokesh Malti Prakash, Activist & Writer, Office Secretary, All India Forum for Right to Education
  45. Anup Pramanik, Indian Institute of Management, Indore
  46. Madhu Prasad. New Delhi
  47. Vijay Prashad, LeftWord Books.
  48. Navtej Purewal, SOAS University of London
  49. Jyoti Puri, Simmons College, Boston, USA
  50. Bandana Purkayastha, Grafton, MA, USA
  51. Meena Radhakrishna, former faculty, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi University
  52. Raghavendra, N. Faculty, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad
  53. Harriet Raghunathan, Jesus and Mary College (retired), New Delhi
  54. Rohit Rahi, London School of Economics, UK
  55. Shirin M. Rai, Warwick University, UK
  56. Rajeswari Sarla Raina, Scientist, New Delhi
  57. Anisa Rahim, Jersey City, NJ
  58. Arvind Rajagopal, New York University, New York, USA
  59. Mrinalini Rajagopalan, University of Pittsburgh, USA
  60. Advaita Rajendra, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  61. Prabina Rajib, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur.
  62. Surampudi Bapi Raju, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India
  63. Priti Ramamurthy, University of Washington, Seattle
  64. Bhavani Raman, University of Toronto, Canada
  65. Usha Raman, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  66. Vasanthi Raman, Independent social scientist, New Delhi
  67. Bharat Ramaswami, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
  68. Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University, Durham USA
  69. Kavitha Ranganathan, IIM-Ahmedabad
  70. Malini Ranganathan, Assistant Professor, American University, Washington, DC
  71. Surabhi Ranganathan, University of Cambridge, UK
  72. Ajay Rao, University of Toronto, Canada
  73. Anupama Rao, Barnard College, New York, USA
  74. Govinda Rao, (Emeritus): National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, Bangalore
  75. Mohan Rao, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  76. Mohan Rao, JNU, New Delhi
  77. Nitya Rao, University of east Anglia, Norwich, UK
  78. Sumathi Rao, Harish-chandra Research Institute, Allahabad
  79. Rashmi Kumari, IIM Ahmedabad
  80. Manav Ratti, Salisbury University, MD, USA
  81. Chitra Ravi, visiting faculty at the Azim Premji University, Bangalore, India.
  82. Anushnath Ravichandran, Coimbatore
  83. Vikas Rawal, Jawaharlal Nehru Uiversity, New Delhi
  84. Debraj Ray, New York University, New York, USA
  85. Raka Ray, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
  86. Ranjan Ray, Economist, Melbourne, Australia
  87. Aparna Rayaprol, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  88. Chandan Reddy, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
  89. Gayatri Reddy, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
  90. Rammanohar Reddy, (Visiting): Goa University, Hyderabad
  91. Rohit Revi, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada
  92. Shaunna Rodrigues, Columbia University, New York, USA
  93. Dunu Roy, Director, Hazards Centre, New Delhi
  94. Mallarika Sinha Roy, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  95. Modhumita Roy, Tufts University, USA
  96. Parama Roy, University of California, Davis
  97. Satyaki Roy, Institute for Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi
  98. Srila Roy, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  99. Srirupa Roy, University of Göttingen, Germany
  100. Anamitra Roychowdhury, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  101. Marlene Rutzendorfer, Harvard University Visiting Scholar, Cambridge, MA, USA
  102. Sachin N, Dyal Singh college, New Delhi
  103. Niladri Saha, Basirhat College, West Bengal
  104. Poulomi Saha, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  105. Bhairabi Prasad Sahu, University of Delhi., Delhi
  106. Arupjyoti Saikia, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati.
  107. Rajgopal Saikumar, New York University, New York, USA
  108. Kalyani Samantray, Visiting Professor, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar
  109. Padmanabh Samarendra, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi
  110. Preeti Sampat, Ambedkar University Delhi.
  111. Samson, Nizamabad district, Telengana
  112. Sudipto Sanyal, Techno India University, Kolkata
  113. Aditya Sarkar, University of Warwick, UK
  114. Sumit Sarkar, (Retired): Delhi University, New Delhi
  115. Tanika Sarkar, (Retired): Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  116. Akshya Saxena, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA
  117. Susan Seizer, Indiana University,  Bloomington IN, USA
  118. Abhijit Sen, Retd from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  119. Hari Sen, Ramjas College, Delhi
  120. Nivedita Sen, Hansraj College, Delhi
  121. Rukmini Sen, Ambedkar University, New Delhi
  122. Sambuddha Sen, Shiv Nadar University, Delhi
  123. Sanghita Sen, St Andrews University, UK
  124. Abhijit Sengupta, University of Essex, UK
  125. Debjani Sengupta, IP College, Delhi University, Delhi
  126. Aaditeshwar Seth, IIT Delhi, Delhi
  127. Puneet Seth, Beachwood, Ohio
  128. Sanjay Seth, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
  129. Svati P. Shah, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
  130. Rachna Shanbog, Dublin, UK
  131. Krupa Shandilya, Amherst College, USA
  132. Arul Shankar, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  133. Shiva Shankar, Scientist, Chennai.
  134. Alpana Sharma, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, USA
  135. Jayeeta Sharma, University of Toronto, Canada
  136. Shailja Sharma, De Paul University, Chicago, USA
  137. Shilpa Sharma, University of Delhi, Delhi
  138. Abhishek Shaw, Economic & Political Weekly, Mumbai
  139. Samira Sheikh, Vanderbilt University, USA
  140. Sherin B.S, The English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad
  141. Parinitha Shetty, Mangaluru, Karnataka
  142. Tim Shiell, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA
  143. Snehal Shingavi, Associate Professor, English, University of Texas, Austin
  144. Anooradha Iyer Siddiqui, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, USA
  145. Amritjit Singh, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA
  146. Harjinder Singh, IIIT- Hyderabad.
  147. Natasha Singh, Oakland, CA
  148. Pritam Singh, Oxford Brookes Business School, Oxford
  149. Radhika Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  150. Supriya Singh, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
  151. Upinder Singh, University of Delhi, New Delhi
  152. Vidhu Singh, San Francisco, CA, USA
  153. Dipa Sinha, Ambedkar University Delhi
  154. Rita Sinha, Janki Devi Memorial College, Delhi
  155. Shana Sippy, Centre College, KY, and Carleton College, MN, USA
  156. Ajay Skaria, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
  157. Sobha Rani, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad
  158. Srilata, K., Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai
  159. Jeena T Srinivasan, Centre for Economic and Social Studies, Hyderabad
  160. Krithika Srinivasan, University of Edinburgh, Scotland
  161. Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
  162. Ravindran Sriramachandran, Ashoka University, Sonipat, Haryana
  163. Neelam Srivastava, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
  164. Priyanka Srivastava, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  165. Hamsa Stainton, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  166. Domna C. Stanton, Graduate Center, City University of New York, USA
  167. Abigail J. Stewart, University of Michigan
  168. Catherine Stimpson, New York University, New York, USA
  169. Sivagami Subbaraman, Washington D.C., USA
  170. Binaya Subedi, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
  171. K Venkata Subrahmanyam, Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai.
  172. Banu Subramaniam, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst MA, USA
  173. Lakshmi Subramanian, Institute of Advanced Studies, Nantes, France
  174. Narendra Subramanian, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
  175. Subramanian, Independent Scholar and former ICSSR National Fellow, Chennai.
  176. Mita Sujan, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA
  177. Nandini Sundar, Delhi University, New Delhi
  178. Vivan Sundaram, artist, New Delhi
  179. S. Sunder, retired professor, The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
  180. Kaushik Sunder Rajan, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  181. Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, New York University, U.S.A.
  182. Shamina Talyarkhan, New York, USA
  183. Ashwini Tambe, University of Maryland, MD, USA
  184. Tanima, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA
  185. Akshaya Tankha, University of Toronto, Canada
  186. Anand Teltumbde, GIM, Goa
  187. Tariq Thachil, Vanderbilt University, USA
  188. Manish Thakur , IIM Calcutta, Kolkata
  189. Binitha Thampi.. IIT Madras, Chennai
  190. Susie Tharu, Hyderabad
  191. Dania Thomas – University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
  192. Thomas Joseph Thoomkuzhy, Gulati Institute of Finance & Taxation, Thiruvananthapuram
  193. Miriam Ticktin, The New School for Social Research, NYC, USA
  194. Ahmet Tonak, (Visiting): University of Massachussetts Amherst, U.S.
  195. Nasir Tyabji, formerly with Jamia Milia Islamia, New Delhi
  196. Sahana Udupa, Professor of Media Anthropology, University of Munich (LMU), Germany
  197. Lalit Vachani, CeMIS, University of Göttingen
  198. Ananya Vajpeyi, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi.
  199. Vamsi Vakulabharanam, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA
  200. Achin Vanaik, Retd from Delhi University, New Delhi
  201. Sarah Van Arsdale, NYU and Antioch University/LA
  202. Hendrik Van Den Berg, (Emeritus): University of Nebraska, U.S.A
  203. Poornima Varma, IIM, Ahmedabad.
  204. Rahul Varma, playwright and artistic director of Teesri Duniya Theatre
  205. Rashmi Varma, Warwick University, UK
  206. Rohit Varman, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Kolkata
  207. Ravi Vasudevan, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, New Delhi
  208. Sylvia Jane Vatuk, Professor Emerita of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Chicago
  209. Malathi Velamuri, Chennai Mathematical Institute, Chennai, India
  210. Shikha Verma, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
  211. K. Vijayan, Hindu College, Delhi
  212. Bhaskar Vira, University of Cambridge, UK
  213. Sujata Visaria, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong.
  214. Gauri Viswanathan, Columbia University, New York, USA
  215. Kamala Visweswaran, University of California San Diego, CA, USA
  216. Shweta Wagh, KRVIA Mumbai
  217. Gareth Wall , University of Birmingham, UK
  218. Jini Watson, New York University, New York, USA
  219. Amanda Weidman, Bryn Mawr College, USA
  220. Thomas Weisskopf, (Emeritus): University of Michigan, U.S.A
  221. Jeannette Wicks-Lim, PERI, University of Massachusetts, Amherst , USA
  222. David Winter, (Emeritus): University of Michigan, USA
  223. Pramod Yadava, Retd Professor, JNU, New Delhi
  224. Louise Yelin, Professor Emerita, Purchase College, Purchase NY, USA
  225. Nobuharu Yokokawa, Musashi University, Japan
  226. Shundana Yusaf, University of Utah, USA

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Sabrang

There Is No Flag Large Enough To Cover The Shame Of Killing Innocent People

25 Apr 2018
The incident happened during protests against visiting Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The protests were mainly organized by groups representing religious minorities in India that feel threatened under the right wing Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) government led by Modi.


Some self-styled Indian patriots settled in UK have launched a petition seeking action against those who tore the Indian national flag recently.

Ever since Modi got elected as Prime Minister in 2014, attacks on religious minorities have grown. The BJP supporters frequently target Muslims and Christians, as well as so-called untouchables. Members of the Sikh minority fear assimilation, since the BJP considers Sikhs as part of the Hindu fold a claim that is vehemently denied by the Sikh leaders). Despite this, the BJP and Hindu Right organizations have been directly or indirectly involved in attacks on Sikhs in the past and during recent times.

The Indian government also reacted sharply to the “act of sacrilege,” and the UK has apologized for the incident.

It is understandable that people can be sensitive about national flags, but considering some recent developments in India, one can argue that this reaction is completely hypocritical.

In fact, the Indian state and its apologists outside the country have no moral right to grumble over what happened in London.

Do we need to remind them that the biggest disgrace to the flag was committed by supporters of the BJP when they rallied in support of those accused of the rape and murder of an eight-year-old Muslim girl in Kathua? belonged to a nomadic community. Some Hindu fanatics conspired to rape and kill her to not only humiliate her community, but to force them to migrate. Clearly, sexual violence was used as a political weapon on an innocent child.

Those who rallied in support of the perpetrators were seen waving the Indian national flag. We need to ask those shedding tears for a torn flag, wasn’t this shameful? Where were these patriots when the national flag was used in defence of the rapists and murderers?

This wasn’t the first time that BJP supporters used the national flag in defence of those involved in heinous crime. Earlier, the dead body of a Hindu extremist who was convicted for the murder of a Muslim and had died due to illness was draped in the national flag. Why was such outrage missing when the coffin of a Hindu bigot was covered with the national flag?

A nation is not defined by a land mass, its boundaries or its national icons, such as flags or emblems. It is represented by its people. These patriots should rather be upset over what the current government and its supporters are doing to the citizens, by denying them equal rights, raping them and killing them with impunity, in complete contradiction to what the Indian constitution stands for. The fashionable patriots who are carried away by a symbolic gesture of protesters in London should rather ask themselves whether or not the Indian constitution is based on the principles of religious freedom and equality? If that is true, then their anger must be directed at Modi and his cohorts, instead of those who only wanted to draw international attention to the ongoing violence against minorities in India.

Gurpreet Singh is a Canada- based journalist who publishes Radical Desi- a monthly magazine that covers alternative politics.
 

There Is No Flag Large Enough To Cover The Shame Of Killing Innocent People

The incident happened during protests against visiting Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The protests were mainly organized by groups representing religious minorities in India that feel threatened under the right wing Hindu nationalist Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) government led by Modi.


Some self-styled Indian patriots settled in UK have launched a petition seeking action against those who tore the Indian national flag recently.

Ever since Modi got elected as Prime Minister in 2014, attacks on religious minorities have grown. The BJP supporters frequently target Muslims and Christians, as well as so-called untouchables. Members of the Sikh minority fear assimilation, since the BJP considers Sikhs as part of the Hindu fold a claim that is vehemently denied by the Sikh leaders). Despite this, the BJP and Hindu Right organizations have been directly or indirectly involved in attacks on Sikhs in the past and during recent times.

The Indian government also reacted sharply to the “act of sacrilege,” and the UK has apologized for the incident.

It is understandable that people can be sensitive about national flags, but considering some recent developments in India, one can argue that this reaction is completely hypocritical.

In fact, the Indian state and its apologists outside the country have no moral right to grumble over what happened in London.

Do we need to remind them that the biggest disgrace to the flag was committed by supporters of the BJP when they rallied in support of those accused of the rape and murder of an eight-year-old Muslim girl in Kathua? belonged to a nomadic community. Some Hindu fanatics conspired to rape and kill her to not only humiliate her community, but to force them to migrate. Clearly, sexual violence was used as a political weapon on an innocent child.

Those who rallied in support of the perpetrators were seen waving the Indian national flag. We need to ask those shedding tears for a torn flag, wasn’t this shameful? Where were these patriots when the national flag was used in defence of the rapists and murderers?

This wasn’t the first time that BJP supporters used the national flag in defence of those involved in heinous crime. Earlier, the dead body of a Hindu extremist who was convicted for the murder of a Muslim and had died due to illness was draped in the national flag. Why was such outrage missing when the coffin of a Hindu bigot was covered with the national flag?

A nation is not defined by a land mass, its boundaries or its national icons, such as flags or emblems. It is represented by its people. These patriots should rather be upset over what the current government and its supporters are doing to the citizens, by denying them equal rights, raping them and killing them with impunity, in complete contradiction to what the Indian constitution stands for. The fashionable patriots who are carried away by a symbolic gesture of protesters in London should rather ask themselves whether or not the Indian constitution is based on the principles of religious freedom and equality? If that is true, then their anger must be directed at Modi and his cohorts, instead of those who only wanted to draw international attention to the ongoing violence against minorities in India.

Gurpreet Singh is a Canada- based journalist who publishes Radical Desi- a monthly magazine that covers alternative politics.
 

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