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Right-wing attempts at targeting BHU iftar deflated!

BHU vice-chancellor Sudhir Kumar Jain was targeted by ABVP for attending iftar gathering

Sabrangindia 02 May 2022

BHU

Banaras Hindu University (BHU) vice-chancellor Sudhir Kumar Jain has been forced to listen to “warnings'' from Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) members, who “surrounded his campus quarters” telling him “not to attend iftar gatherings in future”, reported The Telegraph. According to The Print, a group of 8-9 people, that allegedly included BHU students, as well as others from ABVP, held protests and burnt an effigy of the varsity’s vice-chancellor because they were angry that he had on Wednesday attended an iftar function on campus. The right wing aggression began soon after photographs of Vice-Chancellor Jain at the function held at the BHU’s Mahila Mahavidyalaya were made public on BHU’s twitter handle.

 

 

According to ABVP member Subodh Kumar, who was among those laying siege at the gates of Jain’s residence on Thursday evening, “It was wrong on Jain’s part to attend the iftar gathering. He must promise not to attend iftars in future.” He claimed that a former Vice Chancellor (VC), Girish Chandra Tripathi “had started a tradition of distributing fruits on the occasion of Navratri.” Tripathi, an RSS member and himself an ABVP leader, was appointed VC in 2014, but in 2017, was accused of victim-shaming after a female student alleged molestation, stated news reports. Eventually Tripathi was put on indefinite leave and his tenure was not renewed. However, the ABVP seems to be remembering him fondly even now.

On Friday, ABVP members allegedly burnt effigies of the current VC who had assumed office in January this year. At the iftar organised by teachers and students from both the Hindu and Muslim communities. The VC reportedly also asked students to share their concerts so they could be solved. According to news reports, BHU rector V.K. Shukla and registrar A.K. Singh, were also present at the gathering.

However the University PRO Rajesh Singh defended the secular event and said, “Iftar is an old tradition at the Mahila Mahavidyalaya and the VCs have always attended it. It was discontinued during the (peak of the) pandemic but was resumed this year.” News reports quoted BHU chief proctor B.C. Kapri saying, “Some people are trying to vitiate the atmosphere in the university but we have identified them and will take action against them.” BHU’s assistant information and public relations officer Chander Shekher Gwari, stated facts about the gathering on Twitter, putting on record that the “tradition of organizing iftar in BHU dates back to over 2 decades.” 

 

 

The BHU's official Twitter handle also shared a message by BHU founder Mahamana Madan Mohan Malviya reminding all that “is an inclusive institution”.

 

 

As Eid approaches, right-wing groups and trolls have been busy trying to create unrest, and fuel division. However, across the country, the tradition of interfaith iftar has been upheld. Most recent examples were from Mumbai where many such gatherings were hostend, and attended across communities this week. Even in Kashmir, senior Indian Army officers led by Lt Gen DP Pandey  offered namaz and won hearts online. Lt Gen DP Pandey, and his team are being hailed for sending a public message of communal harmony. In Delhi’s Jahangirpuri, Hindu and Muslim citizens took out peace march holding Tricolour.

 

Related:

Restoring faith in unity: Mumbai’s Iftar parties

Patiala violence: Expelled Shiv Sena leader arrested

Senior Indian Army officers offer Namaz in Kashmir, shut trolls down

Right-wing attempts at targeting BHU iftar deflated!

BHU vice-chancellor Sudhir Kumar Jain was targeted by ABVP for attending iftar gathering

BHU

Banaras Hindu University (BHU) vice-chancellor Sudhir Kumar Jain has been forced to listen to “warnings'' from Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) members, who “surrounded his campus quarters” telling him “not to attend iftar gatherings in future”, reported The Telegraph. According to The Print, a group of 8-9 people, that allegedly included BHU students, as well as others from ABVP, held protests and burnt an effigy of the varsity’s vice-chancellor because they were angry that he had on Wednesday attended an iftar function on campus. The right wing aggression began soon after photographs of Vice-Chancellor Jain at the function held at the BHU’s Mahila Mahavidyalaya were made public on BHU’s twitter handle.

 

 

According to ABVP member Subodh Kumar, who was among those laying siege at the gates of Jain’s residence on Thursday evening, “It was wrong on Jain’s part to attend the iftar gathering. He must promise not to attend iftars in future.” He claimed that a former Vice Chancellor (VC), Girish Chandra Tripathi “had started a tradition of distributing fruits on the occasion of Navratri.” Tripathi, an RSS member and himself an ABVP leader, was appointed VC in 2014, but in 2017, was accused of victim-shaming after a female student alleged molestation, stated news reports. Eventually Tripathi was put on indefinite leave and his tenure was not renewed. However, the ABVP seems to be remembering him fondly even now.

On Friday, ABVP members allegedly burnt effigies of the current VC who had assumed office in January this year. At the iftar organised by teachers and students from both the Hindu and Muslim communities. The VC reportedly also asked students to share their concerts so they could be solved. According to news reports, BHU rector V.K. Shukla and registrar A.K. Singh, were also present at the gathering.

However the University PRO Rajesh Singh defended the secular event and said, “Iftar is an old tradition at the Mahila Mahavidyalaya and the VCs have always attended it. It was discontinued during the (peak of the) pandemic but was resumed this year.” News reports quoted BHU chief proctor B.C. Kapri saying, “Some people are trying to vitiate the atmosphere in the university but we have identified them and will take action against them.” BHU’s assistant information and public relations officer Chander Shekher Gwari, stated facts about the gathering on Twitter, putting on record that the “tradition of organizing iftar in BHU dates back to over 2 decades.” 

 

 

The BHU's official Twitter handle also shared a message by BHU founder Mahamana Madan Mohan Malviya reminding all that “is an inclusive institution”.

 

 

As Eid approaches, right-wing groups and trolls have been busy trying to create unrest, and fuel division. However, across the country, the tradition of interfaith iftar has been upheld. Most recent examples were from Mumbai where many such gatherings were hostend, and attended across communities this week. Even in Kashmir, senior Indian Army officers led by Lt Gen DP Pandey  offered namaz and won hearts online. Lt Gen DP Pandey, and his team are being hailed for sending a public message of communal harmony. In Delhi’s Jahangirpuri, Hindu and Muslim citizens took out peace march holding Tricolour.

 

Related:

Restoring faith in unity: Mumbai’s Iftar parties

Patiala violence: Expelled Shiv Sena leader arrested

Senior Indian Army officers offer Namaz in Kashmir, shut trolls down

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