Government to amend Cinematograph Law, may alter Censor Board's role

Written by Sabrangindia Staff | Published on: October 28, 2016
Following a number of controversies surrounding censorship pf of films and protests against unwarranted cuts by the censor board, central government revealed it plans to amend the six decades old cinematography law, according to a PTI report.

Venkaiah Naidu
Image: Hindustan Times

Information and Broadcasting Minister M Venkaiah Naidu admitted that the changes recommended by Justice Mudgal committee and Benegal committee will have to be recommended.

He said, “Justice (Mukul) Mudgal committee and (Shyam) Benegal committee have made some important recommendations. I am examining them. At the end of the day, you have to implement those. I may have to make some changes in the law also.”

However he did not provide a timeframe within which the issue will be taken up. He said, “I am moving in that direction. I can't give you any timeframe because of the Winter session. I don't think I will be able to complete this. My efforts will certainly be to take up the new legislation in the session thereafter.”

He reportedly said that he had informed the secretary of the censor board about the recommendations and had also sought the opinion of board members. "I told him to study and get back. Government is open to making necessary changes,” said Naidu.

The Cinematograph Act, 1952 mandates the constitution of Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) for the purpose of “sanctioning films for public exhibition”. The role of censor board in the recent years have been questioned following allegations of moral policing in the process of certification by the board.

Naidu, who took over the charge of the ministry about four months ago, says he is aware of the controversies surrounding the censor board and feels there should be some restraint from both the sides – CBFC and film industry.

"I am aware of certain controversies with regards to censor certificate issue and censor board. Controversies per se should have been avoided,” he said.

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